• Apr 13, 2011
Xiang Dong Yu, the former Ford engineer who was convicted of stealing trade secrets, has officially been sentenced to six years in prison. According to Reuters, the Beijing native was also ordered to pay a fine of $12,500 and will be deported after he serves his prison term. The 49-year-old Yu was arrested in 2009 on charges that he stole documents worth millions of dollars from his former employer during the 10 years that he worked for Ford.
Yu took a job with a U.S.-based company working in China in December of 2006 and copied some 4,000 Ford documents onto a personal hard drive before leaving or notifying the automaker of his new employer. The documents reportedly covered everything from engine and transmission details to electric power supply systems – all bits of information that would be incredibly tasty to China's growing automotive industry. Yu eventually took a position with Beijing Automotive Corporation.

[Source: Reuters]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 40 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      Look the smirk on his face - he already knows his job is done. China (and any other country) should be better than this, morally.
      • 3 Years Ago
      What a slimy POS.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I would often see "people" at auto shows "posing " as journos with vernier calipers, scales with digital camera in hand and spending a lot of time inside and around the newest models. Strange.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Ford acted foolishly. They should have hired private detectives to insert new files to their Chinese spy. It would contain "Top Secret" files on how to manufacture the best cars but in reality would be how to apply Ford Pinto technology along your entire line.

      Cue in to the scenes of Chinese streets full of Chinese-made cars bursting in flames.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Hindsight is 20/20.

        Ford would'nt have known he was a spy when they hired him. Duh.
      • 3 Years Ago
      True Chinese ingenuity at its finest.
      • 3 Years Ago
      The world is a-changing. Not every country respects intellectual property like the U.S. In a perfect world, they would. National borders no longer matter as much as they once did. The entire world is a market. Buy a Ford, Chevy or Chrysler off a lot take it apart and almost anyone can figure out how to make a copy. U.S. automakers would be wise to start finding new ways to differentiate themselves on the global stage (i.e. marketing, innovation, CUSTOMER SATISFACTION, QUALITY, buying experience, servicing, etc.). We'd be naive to think that we can eliminate all corporate espionage. Just my two cents.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Pathetic. 40 years would have been more like it, Make an Example of him. Ford were Fools for hiring him.

      I wish we as consumers would stop supporting China, Bring the jobs back to America one by one, Support companies who provide jobs for Americans. We should vote with our Dollars.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well, Ford make it easier for this to happen when they source manual transmissions from China to put into American cars.

      • 3 Years Ago
      Us westerners are way too naive. The Chinese govt has infiltrated all our institutions, and we hold the door open for them.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @leongzhang

        You obviously didnt get what he meant.

        He didnt praise China or is supporting China. He is warning other of China's malicious tactics.

        By saying "thank you", you are are saying you support China's malicious intents of industrial espionage.

        How suprising...

        • 3 Years Ago
        thank you.
      • 3 Years Ago
      You can sentence him after you sentence all the automotive CEOs that have stolen billions from employees and stock holders by grossly mismanaging their companies while still paying themselves millions.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Rather a mild punishment, considering the crime. With good behavior he will likely only serve 3-4 years. Then it's back to China where he will no doubt be richly rewarded for his treachery.

      I wonder what the punishment in China is for corporate espionage? Death?
      • 3 Years Ago
      The Chinese....what a sad international JOKE.
    • Load More Comments