• Aug 9, 2010
Reynard Inverter – Click above for high-res image gallery

One of the great things about being a gearhead in the UK is the Individual Vehicle Approval (IVA) process. In short,
the IVA (formerly the Single Vehicle Type approval) is a set of rules that allows one-offs and very low volume vehicles to be approved if they meet only the most basic requirements of a road car. If it's equipped with head- and taillights, turn signals, seat belts and doesn't spew too much smoke or have any other obvious issues, you can get it registered. Lotus uses IVA to make UK street versions of its 2-Eleven track car and that's how Reynard Racing Cars will now sell the Inverter – a race car barely adapted for the street – to liven up your daily commute.

Power is currently available from either a 1,000-cc Honda Fireblade or 1,340-cc Suzuki Hayabusa inline-four, but a variant powered by a 2.0-liter Ford Duratec is under development. With the road version weighing a mere 981 pounds, the 180 horsepower Fireblade should provide plenty of performance. The Inverter starts at £35,000 for a turn-key unit (that's around $56,000 USD including Britain's Value Added Tax) or you can get a rolling chassis and body starting at £14,900 (in the neighborhood of $24k). Check out video and specs after the jump.



[Source: Reynard Racing Cars]




Show full PR text
The Inverter is the first ever road car from Indy 500 winning race car constructor Reynard (History)

Developed by Andre Brown in an F1 spec 50% scale wind tunnel to give up to 1200kg downforce, the 440kg Inverter produces one of the highest lateral g per £ of any sportscar, with sustained cornering over 3g recorded.

Prices start at £35,000 for a track ready car including 180bhp Fireblade engine, we can supply RH & LH drive cars for race, trackday & road use, in both turnkey and kit form. Initial cars will be made available as rolling chassis + body, which will cost £14,900 on order, the balance depending on your options which can be chosen to suit your application.

It is our intention to bring about the end of one make race series, which tend towards becoming overpriced monopolies, devoid of engineering innovation, diversity, and creativity. Surely customer service is dead when spares are so overpriced and you have to buy them from a single source just to enter the race? It is our intention to go Open Source with our proven designs, so that anyone who wants to race with us can do so with full access to our engineering drawings so that they can manufacture and design their own parts if they want.

Our online store will soon have all drawings available for download, as well as the physical parts for purchase from a variety of suppliers including our existing supply chain, all competing on price, quality and customer service. Or, if you would like to manufacture and sell the entire car in your country, we are offering an official franchise package where you can buy original molds and jigs (see our Brochure).



Reynard is happy to build your car using your choice of components - please ask about compatibility.

2 seater sportscar - track focused with road legal option (IVA)
Designed to 750mc bikesports race regulations, --- US spec SCCA DSR CSR options planned
Weight : 400kg (Race) --- 445kg (Road)
Power: 180bhp (1000cc Fireblade) or 200bhp (1340cc Hayabusa) --- Duratec / Sports 2000 in development
Aero - Max Downforce: 2600lbs (1180kg) --- Best L/D configuration: 5.8:1
Width: 1.5m (minimised for lower drag - ideal for hillclimbs) --- Wheelbase: 2.4m
Top Speed: 135mph (Geared for Fireblade engine)
Tyres: Race Avon F3 Front 13x8 & Rear 13x10 --- Road Toyo Proxes R888 Front 16x7 & Rear 17x9
Bodywork: Carbon Fibre or Glass Fibre. 3 piece upper & full underbody diffuser. Front & Rear wings in Carbon.
Chassis: 55kg Stainless Steel with composite panel stiffeners to 750mc regulations. FIA chassis available on request
Safety: 6 point harnesses, aluminium honeycomb panel front crashbox & 1" side impact panels. Steering column is collapsible Ford Ka to comply with IVA regulations.
Brakes: Front Alcon 2 piston. Rear - billet machined with integral handbrake caliper
Suspension: TIG welded CDS wishbones, Nitron NTR single adjustable shocks, ALL suspension parts non-handed - ie will fit LHS and RHS to reduce spares requirement
Interior: Farringdon Dash/steering wheel. Tillett Seats. Tilton Pedals. Pingel Electronic Gearchange.
Options: Geartronics pneumatic paddle change. AIM steering wheel & logger. DC Electronics raychem wiring loom


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 10 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Wow what a track day car. Drive it there, and run it there. Must be a lot of fun with that power to weight ratio
      • 4 Years Ago
      can we all stop badmouthing kit car builders. Of course reynard knows better than a single tinkering entrepreneur with a welder, but the phrase, "actually know what they're doing" is an unnecessary slight that reinforces a prejudice against the entire gamut of kit builders, a far more admirable personal pursuit than major manufacturing. there's a lot of variety out there to be admired. Just because the inverter is a cut above most in terms of racetrack cred doesn't mean someone should just go reinforcing someone's complacentness in an avensis over "crappy fiberglass kits that some idiot made", etc.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Whoa buddy, I'm not bashing kit cars - my response was to this:

        "And please oh please make that wing shorter. There is no real reason for it to stick out like a boom on a tree trimming truck... I am sure they stuck it there because they wanted, as I don't see them having access to a wind tunnel."

        My intent was to convey they fact that the Reynard Inverter's wing placement was probably not arbitrary, given the firm's longstanding history in motorsports, including their most recent foray in to sports cars (endurance sport prototypes). The Inverter's design and aero package clearly draw upon it's LMP heritage. This car is probably the closest thing to a road-going LMP that you can find, and it's built by a company that actually used to make genuine articles, which most kit car builders can't claim. Therefore, when it comes to wing placement, size, chord length, camber, endplate design, etc they do actually know what they're doing.

      • 4 Years Ago
      Really hideous styling.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Hey, they stole that spoiler idea from the '93 civic with euro lights and red rims that I saw last week.
      • 4 Years Ago
      i suppose we can thank the IVA process for allowing some of Top Gear's craziest contraptions on public roads. That two story citroen camper looked like it was putting a lot of people at risk on the road!
      • 4 Years Ago
      The nose needs to be a bit more round to match the rest. And please oh please make that wing shorter. There is no real reason for it to stick out like a boom on a tree trimming truck.

      I am sure they stuck it there because they wanted, as I don't see them having access to a wind tunnel.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Reynard used to build full-blow Le Mans prototypes. It's not just a fiberglass garage kit car. These guys actually kinda know what they're doing. The Reynards still live on (in one form or another) as the Creation CA/series and the Zytek cars.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "Developed by Andre Brown in an F1 spec 50% scale wind tunnel to give up to 1200kg downforce, the 440kg Inverter produces one of the highest lateral g per £ of any sportscar, with sustained cornering over 3g recorded."
        • 4 Years Ago
        Well, I stand corrected then :)