• Jun 3, 2010
Geely Emgrand plug-in hybrid – Click above for high-res image gallery

If you pay them, they will come. At least that's the philosophy China is applying to the electric car business these days. The people's republic is set to roll out new pilot programs in four of its largest cities aimed at curbing emissions by promoting plug-in hybrids and EVs. The country is handing out the equivalent of around $7,320 in incentives for the purchase of more green-minded automobiles. At first, the program will only be available to those who live in Shanghai, Shenzhen, Hangzhou and Hefei, though depending on its success, it may spread to other parts of the country.

As a result of the incentives, Chinese manufacturers are beginning to give EVs and plug-in hybrids some serious thought, and automakers like BYD, Geely and SAIC Motor Corp have all announced varying plans for production. The news will likely go a long way toward helping China get a grip on its raging air quality problems, especially in its larger metropolitan areas.

According to Automotive News, the Chinese government is also offering a nationwide subsidy program for small-engine vehicles. Any car with a 1.6-liter engine or smaller that consumes 20 percent less fuel than current standards is eligible for a $440 incentive.



[Source: Automotive News]
Photos by Sam Abuelsamid / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Are they giving big incentives to buy ugly vehicles? Because that's what the Emgrand needs.
      • 4 Years Ago
      $7,320 in incentives? Holy crap, that's a lot of Yuan... This is a good thing. Curious selection of cities, though.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I don't think it's a weird selection of cities...they're all very populous cities with pollution problems, people wealthy enough to buy cars, and with provincial governments that are quite well-off and influential (not to mention the fact that they contribute a fair deal of taxes to the national economy). It'd be weird if they rolled it out in less developed areas.
      • 4 Years Ago
      there are way too many big SUVs in China now. the new policy is not only good thing for China, it is a good thing for the whole world. it will be great if China can start a totally different car culture
      • 4 Years Ago
      Good for them, as I would've expected their first incentive choice to have been "Because we say so!".
      • 4 Years Ago
      God..the butt grill is back...
      • 4 Years Ago
      Good for them - they are realizing that their fuel consumption on a national level is going to get rather ginormous very quickly, which brings both economic and political/military problems. And at the same time they can foster a home-grown industry of hybrid/EV technology.

      Then they can take that knowledge-base and sell it back to inefficient countries that didn't have the foresight to realize how big this industry will become.

      Seems that someone in China is taking the long-view approach. Too bad there aren't enough people in this country that can think that far ahead and realize that green jobs and green technology is the future - so we either get a heads-up on it now and then exploit it to our benefit, or get left behind.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The engine size requirement is an odd one, actually... why not offer an incentive to anyone who purchases a vehicle more than 20% as efficient as the standard, regardless of how it achieves it?
        • 4 Years Ago
        I believe they are trying to keep people from buying large cars. Now that more and more Chinese are buying cars for the first time, maybe they want to start a culture of smaller, more efficient cars than large SUV's and sedans like the US got used to. In the long run, its probably a smart move.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The Buick Volt might do well there.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Absolutely, assuming it will go on sale in time. Its 40 mile range is more than enough, most people in Chinese cities drive far less than that every day.