• Feb 22, 2010
2011 Cadillac CTS-V Coupe – Click above for high-res image gallery

Amidst all the turmoil at General Motors last year, Cadillac lost a large chunk of its European distribution with the collapse of its partner, the Kroymans Group. General Motors has now decided to make a renewed push into the continent with its premium brand and is setting up its own distribution network to handle sales and service.

Cadillac Europe will handle the task of marketing the CTS and SRX in all of their various incarnations. The CTS Sportwagon and Coupe will join the sedan following the coupe's European debut in Geneva next week. Europe was actually intended to be the primary market for the Sportwagon since drivers there don't seem to have the aversion to that body style that Americans do. Later this year, the SRX joins the party and Cadillac will continue to offer the big Escalade hybrid to the three of four people that are interested.

Unfortunately, according to Cadillac spokesman Nick Twork, the much-anticipated 2.9-liter turbodiesel V6 that was announced three years ago at the Geneva Motor Show is no longer part of the plan. The oil burner that likely would have done much to help expand Cadillac's appeal in that market. Instead, Twork tells Autoblog that Cadillac will "be a niche brand."


Show full PR text
Cadillac Plans New Start In Europe

- CTS Coupe celebrates European premiere at the Geneva Motor Show
- CTS-V Coupe to follow late in 2010
- New SRX and CTS Sport Wagon will be available this summer

DETROIT– A newly created organization, Cadillac Europe, will be established to manage import, distribution and marketing of a selected range of Cadillac models specified for the European markets. The vehicles will be retailed through a fully authorized Cadillac sales and service network in key European markets. Specific details will be announced at a later date.

"Europe is an important market for Cadillac," said Bryan Nesbitt, Cadillac general manager. "Re-establishing distribution of our premium offerings is good news for those who seek import exclusiveness"

At the Geneva Motor Show, Cadillac presents the CTS Coupe for the first time in Europe. Slated to arrive in North American Cadillac showrooms this summer and this fall in Europe, the CTS Coupe is a new luxury sports coupe designed to become the visual centerpiece of the brand's revised lineup.

The Coupe is a classic 2+2 layout bolstered with advanced technology, such as a rear-view camera system and a performance-oriented suspension, combined with rear-wheel or all-wheel drive.

The Coupe joins the CTS Sport Sedan, the 556-horsepower (415 kW) CTS-V and new CTS Sport Wagon as the foundation of Cadillac's lineup. A high-performance V-Series edition of the Coupe will also be released this year.

In Geneva, Cadillac will also exhibit the new CTS Sport Wagon, CTS Sport Sedan and the range-topping CTS-V. The new CTS Sport Wagon will be available as of model year 2011, while the CTS Sport Sedan and the CTS-V are available now. Additionally, Cadillac will present the new SRX, a midsize luxury crossover, featuring a completely new design combined with an efficient, high-technology engine. The new SRX goes on sale in Europe with model year 2011.

The Cadillac Escalade Hybrid will also be shown in Geneva. The Cadillac Escalade Hybrid is the first full-size luxury SUV worldwide featuring the fuel-saving Two-Mode Hybrid System. This vehicle offers more than 40-percent fuel consumption reduction in city driving and dramatically reduced exhaust emissions, while offering all the advantages of a spacious luxury SUV.

Two-Mode Hybrid technology can operate the vehicle solely on battery-electric power during idling or low-speed driving situations. The permanently all-wheel-driven Escalade Hybrid also incorporates Active Fuel Management technology that enables the 6.0L V-8 engine to operate on only four cylinders in certain driving conditions to save fuel.

About Cadillac

Cadillac has been a leading luxury auto brand since 1902. In recent years, Cadillac has engineered a historic renaissance led by artful engineering and global expansion.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 58 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      The arrogance of GM astounds me. Opel/Vauxhall couldn't sell an Omega these days and GM thinks Europe cares for Caddy? Caddy means nothing to the average European, even when they're re-bodied Saab 9-3s, itself no record-breaker.

      Give up FFS, because you're endangering Opel/Vauxhall every time you do something stupid. Shame the Magna plan included the dastardly Ruskies, because I'd have been ecstatic to see them cut ties with GM, who until recently held them back so much.
        • 4 Years Ago
        i would be great if the Americans and Japanese would bring some competition to Europe.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Cadillac was already in Europe. This is just a move to keep the sales they already have (which likely isn't many).
      • 4 Years Ago
      Stupid, stupid, stupid move.

      First off, wait until the new ATS and XTS comes out to give Europe a full range of cars to really go up against the likes of BMW and Mercedes, and for the love of jebus offer a diesel even if you have to partner with some other automaker to get one.

      Trying to regain a real presence in Europe is smart, but you have to do it with the right product.
      • 4 Years Ago
      GM wants Cadillac to compete with the likes of BMW, Jaguar, and Mercedes-Benz. BMW, Mercedes-Benz, and even Jaguar offer diesels. So what's the deal here? Big Ed? Lutz? Reuss? Bueller? Anyone?
      • 4 Years Ago
      Good luck, Caddy.
      Shame on you, FoMoCo/Lincoln! :(
        • 4 Years Ago
        You can't be European, Yaroukh, that's for sure.

        Cadillac is a non-player in the European luxury car market, and it would have to invest billions in marketing to even make people here *aware* of it [and think of it as a "premium" brand]. Russians might be the exception, in this sense they're not part of the European car market.

        Cadillacs look very different from European cars, and that is mostly negative. For a few maybe it can be positive (unusual). The brand is NOT recognized in any sense of the word, so even the second hand value is low [and your loss bigger].

        There is a specialty dealer for US cars in my city, and they have a few Cadillacs, but they hardly sell any at all. We're talking one or two a year. I've seen one on the road, once. The local Audi, BMW and Mercedes dealers sell hundreds. (It's a small city).

        And forget, forget, about Ford/Lincoln ever having a chance in Europe. They're not here now, people here have never heard about Lincoln, it would be a pointless uphill struggle to enter the market for both. Nevermind that you would have to "federalize" it to European standards and tastes.
        • 4 Years Ago
        And somehow you are wrong, I am European as they come.
        1) No one said it will be easy for Caddy, no one said it would be easy for Lincoln. Was it easy for Lexus?
        2) It is only logical step for every major automaker to have its premium brand, and that means entering all markets, soon or later.
        3) As for federalizing: FoMoCo goes global anyways, and soon or later, I believe, US and EU will make their regulations compatible anyways.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Wagons rule
      • 4 Years Ago
      GM will go bankrupt again quite fast...
      Making the same mistake twice is rather stupid.

      The last time they tried this (just a few years ago), they opened two dealers in my country, and sold a single car that year. Total. One.

      Nobody -but really nobody- wants Cadillacs in Europe.

      They are perceived like big poorly built plasticky american barges for people with no taste and no quality demands, and that image will never go away, just the same way you're still saying Fiats are unreliable almost 40 years after the X1/9.

      It will never be profitable making the huge investment in a distribution network to try to do again what they tried and failed to do just 5 years ago.

      And no diesel? :) It really makes me smile: they are clueless about the european market.
        • 4 Years Ago
        So, you're concerned that Cadillac's reliability will challenge it in sales against the likes of Jaguar and Audi?
        • 4 Years Ago
        New Management = Try again, make the same mistakes, learn what not to do. Then get replaced. Start cycle all over again......
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Jake

        I think it's not about the product and it's qualities: it's about the brand image in this market. It's my personal belief.

        Either way, they already tried to sell them here, and it was massively proven that it was impossible. Can't imagine why they'd think it would be a good idea to try again.

        I'm sure they have advisers, market studies, etc.. But if they really knew how to do things, they wouldn't have gone bankrupt like they did just a few months ago, right?
      • 4 Years Ago
      I'm sorry... what? is there another diesel mil they'll be tossing in instead? or none at all. if it's the later situation... bwahahahahahahahahaha. breath. bwahahahahahaha.
        • 4 Years Ago
        It's going to be small volume... you can't justify engineering and building an engine at the tiny volume they'll sell at. I imagine they will reconsider it for the next generation based on what kind of market penetration they have been able to achieve.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I disagree. The comments in this thread make it sound like all cars are diesel in Europe. Last I heard, it was more like 50/50 between petrol and diesel. So using their existing petrol engine, they get half the market to play with while they grow band awareness and distribution network. If they can't break into the market at all without a diesel, they won't do it with a diesel.
        Carlos
        • 4 Years Ago
        Title should read Cadillac is dead in Europe.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Alex, that becomes a self-fulfilling prophesy. As long as Cadillac does not have diesel engine options, it will be condemned to being a small, niche brand in Europe. If they're not going to spend the money to effectively market the brand in Europe, they are better off not doing it all.

        Do it right or go home.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @alex
        No need to develop a new diesel engine: Opel/Vauxhall has plenty of them... their 2.0 of 160 cv wouldn't be bad, specially considering it's 258 ft torque, for instance. A more powerful version would be nice, though, for sure.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Maybe they should wait until the new ATS is launched.
      • 4 Years Ago
      What the hell is wrong with GM. They will go bankrupt again, mark my words, if they keep making stupid decisions sooner rather then later.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Cadillac needs a diesel to compete in the Executive class in Europe.
      If GM wants to compete in Europe they need to hire someone in Europe to sell their cars and can tell them what to do!!!!!

      • 4 Years Ago
      In Europe: No diesel = No sales

      Maybe Cadillac can use the 2.0 CDTI with 160hp used in the Opel Insignia, but I think it's to small for a Cadillac.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Why couldn't they sell them through Opel's dealer network?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Opel is NOT a premium brand in Europe, it would be self-defeating to promote a "premium" brand like Cadillac next to Opel.

        And it doesn't help that Cadillac is virtually unknown and uninteresting for most Europeans. I know the brand and I would never buy one because of the *designs*. They're extremely "alien" designs and not made for European tastes.

        Not to mention the fact that it's a bad investment if you plan on selling it after a few years, there is no market for Cadillac here.
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