• Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
Toyota has cut the monthly lease rate on its Mirai hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle by $150 to $349. The automaker says that the model's $57,500 MSRP is not changing, and neither is the $865 destination fee. The car is eligible for a $8,000 federal tax credit and a $5,000 California rebate. Leaseholders can still get three years of free fuel.

Under the model-year 2017, 36-month lease terms for the Mirai, Toyota is asking for $2,499 at signing (down from $3,649) for a 12,000-mile annual driving allowance. Toyota also offers an eight-year, 100,000-mile warranty on the car, and includes perks such as the Mirai Complimentary Rental Experience, which offers seven free rental days per year, and no cost for either scheduled maintenance or roadside assistance for three years. Take a look at Toyota's press release here.

Toyota started selling the Mirai in California late last year with a $499 monthly lease rate, and offers the car at eight dealerships across the state. The car, which can go as far as 312 miles on a full tank of hydrogen, now comes in a fourth exterior color – "Atmospheric Blue" – as a 2017 option.

Through August, Toyota leased or sold just 641 Mirai vehicles, though August's sales of 371 units marked a new monthly record. Meanwhile, hydrogen refueling stations are gradually being deployed throughout California, with refueling-station maker True Zero operating 15 stations in the state and planning four more by next year. True Zero recently proved the point of its growing ubiquity by driving a Toyota Mirai more than 1,400 miles across California in a 24-hour period, setting a Guinness Record for single-day zero-emissions vehicle driving in the process.

As far as other variants of the Mirai go, reports surfaced this spring that the Japanese automaker may produce a smaller, cheaper Mirai in time for the 2020 Summer Olympics.

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