• Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
  • Image Credit: Darin Schnabel/RM
We've seen some high-priced metal come up under the hammer in Arizona over the years, but the one you're looking at right here is the most expensive ever sold during the famous auction weekend.

It's a Ferrari 250 Le Mans from 1964, the ninth of just 32 examples made. And RM Auctions just sold it for $9,625,000. That doesn't make it the most expensive Ferrari ever sold at auction, or even the top price paid for a 250 LM: according to figures from Sports Car Market, the same auction house has handled the top five highest-grossing 250 LMs of all time, including the 1965 Le Mans winner that sold in New York in 2013 for $14.3 million and another that sold last August in Monterey for $11.5 million. But it does make this example, according to RM, "the most valuable automobile sold in Arizona auction history."

One of the earliest mid-engined Ferraris, the 250 LM was the last of Maranello's Le Mans winners. This particular example, chassis number 5899 GT, was sold by the factory to the famed Swiss racing team Scuderia Filipinetti, winning the Sierre-Montana Crans Hill Climb fresh out the box, followed immediately by another win at the XV Coppa Inter-Europa at Monza – both at the hands of Ferrari F1 and Le Mans drivers. After Filipinetti was done with it, 5899 GT was displayed at the Geneva Motor Show, was sold off the stand and changed hands a few more times – including one owner who oddly replaced the bodywork with that of a Porsche 906 Carrera 6 and another who swapped out the engine. It went on to win many more races, and was ultimately reunited with its original engine and proper bodywork. Restored several times over, 5899 GT was certified ten years ago by the Ferrari Classiche department and was even displayed at the factory museum in Maranello.

The 250 LM wasn't the only noteworthy lot RM sold this weekend in the Frank Lloyd Wright Ballroom at the Arizona Biltmore, though. Several other Ferraris sold in the millions, from a '67 275 GTB/4 that sold for $3.6 million to a 2005 FXX Evoluzione for $1.6 million. The '71 Lamborghini Miura SVJ that was tipped to break the $2-million mark ultimately sold for under $1.9M, and the '84 Audi Sport Quattro ultimately dropped right in its estimate range at $401,500. All told, RM sold 90 percent of the metal it was consigned for the event, bringing in a whopping $63.7 million in sales.


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