Equus Automotive combines retro muscle car styling and a modern, 640-horsepower engine.

The Equus Bass 770 has gone viral, and it's not hard to see why. The retro styling of the boutique modern muscle car draws inspiration mainly from the old Ford Mustang fastback, but also the Dodge Challenger, and it's powered by a thoroughly modern supercharged 6.2-liter V8 that makes 640 horsepower, a la Chevrolet's recently departed Corvette ZR1. It all comes together to give the Bass 770 a claimed 0-60 miles-per-hour time of 3.4 seconds and top speed of 200 mph, which makes us wonder why it took a short piece by Thrillist that ended up on the front page of Reddit to make people notice (including us). Apparently, the thing already has been out for almost a year, according to Equus Automotive's Facebook page.

Detroit-based Equus Automotive developed the car for six years to arrive at the product you see here. An aluminum chassis was built for the Bass 770, and its body is made out of aluminum lined with carbon fiber. The combination of strong, lightweight materials is sure to keep body flex to a minimum and, crucially, the weight down on this 3,640-pound muscle car. Unlike muscle cars of yore, the Bass 770 is generously equipped with safety features, such as airbags, and creature comforts that include a leather interior with the ceiling in Alcantara, air-conditioning, GPS, radio with CD and DVD capability, USB port, tire pressure monitoring system and cruise control.

To offset the weight of the big engine up front, the folks at Equus Automotive decided to mount a six-speed dual-clutch manual transmission (yes, a twin-disc manual) at the rear. Michael Qualid of Equus Automotive says, "An automatic transmission could be available in the near future with different engine combinations."

While we haven't driven it (yet), we imagine the handling greatly benefits from the weight distribution afforded by the transaxle layout. That's a good thing when you're drifting a 640-horsepower muscle car - which you can see in a video we included below. But if you want to join in on the action, be ready to pony up at least $253,000 for your own Bass 770.