In 2010, automotive supplier Faurecia showed off a car seat that, via Bluetooth communication with a smartphone app, would adjust itself based on information the occupant had entered. It looks like that was too much work for a busy executive to do, because Automotive News has a story on how that seat has progressed, and it's now almost fully automatic.

Called "Oasis" and being developed for the chauffeured classes, a camera in the back of the front seat detects the eye position of the back seat occupant and the system estimates his height. The Oasis seat detects the person's weight, and uses all of that info to automatically reconfigure itself into the 'best' position. Adjustments are made with a "mouselike control panel" next to the seat.

Johnson Controls, another major supplier, is also working on an automatic seat. Its unit uses a smartphone or cabin console interface that also establishes height first, then the seat notes the occupant's posture and repositions itself. According to the story, this technology isn't far away, with "elements of [Faurecia's] self-adjusting concept seat" slated for a US vehicle in 2015.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 7 Comments
      Alex Ingram
      • 9 Months Ago
      Demolition Man predicted this years ago. Be well!
      Love Great Danes
      • 9 Months Ago
      Looks like the chair from the last season of Dexter
      Brandon Allen
      • 9 Months Ago
      I think this is a perfect example of taking a good idea and making it worse by assuming that it needs to be integrated with a smartphone app. I mean, why not just have little piezo sensors at all of the pressure points, have them 'calibrate' when the person sits down so they can simply shift their weight to adjust the seat? Lazy boy recliners basically do this mechanically by spring-loading their reclining and leg rest extensions with the right amount of weight so you can just lean back and lift your legs and have the seat lock into place. Just hit a button, adjust to the position you want and have the seat lock. I hate the idea of fumbling for your phone or some device to adjust your seat.
        Brandon Allen
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Brandon Allen
        And when I say "Calibrate" I mean figure out when the person is sitting still and when they are adjusting their weight so the parts know to move up or down. By saying "pressure sensor" that would have made more sense - I basically explained what a '"pressure sensor" is. Anyway, I think when self-driving luxury cars start hitting the market, we'll see the most amazing luxury seat technology come along with it.
      Joe Carter
      • 9 Months Ago
      And for the low cost of $100,000, it can be yours!
      RetrogradE
      • 9 Months Ago
      I remember a time (and I'm not that old) when we used to drive to see the country. I still do. I travel from Salt Lake to Vegas once a month and between my BMW Adventure bike and my Avant, I take different routes every time. So much to see. I can sit in a recliner and watch TV at home. . .
      Brian
      • 9 Months Ago
      my god, by 2030, we'd all be sitting vegetables. Is it necessary to have self adjusting seats?? like it's so hard to bend over and adjust the lever?? I'm an engineer myself and embrace technological advances.. but what does this bring to the table when some vehicles already remember your seating position? It eliminates the ONE time you actually have to adjust your seat manually and press save??