In 2010, automotive supplier Faurecia showed off a car seat that, via Bluetooth communication with a smartphone app, would adjust itself based on information the occupant had entered. It looks like that was too much work for a busy executive to do, because Automotive News has a story on how that seat has progressed, and it's now almost fully automatic.

Called "Oasis" and being developed for the chauffeured classes, a camera in the back of the front seat detects the eye position of the back seat occupant and the system estimates his height. The Oasis seat detects the person's weight, and uses all of that info to automatically reconfigure itself into the 'best' position. Adjustments are made with a "mouselike control panel" next to the seat.

Johnson Controls, another major supplier, is also working on an automatic seat. Its unit uses a smartphone or cabin console interface that also establishes height first, then the seat notes the occupant's posture and repositions itself. According to the story, this technology isn't far away, with "elements of [Faurecia's] self-adjusting concept seat" slated for a US vehicle in 2015.