Studebaker Woody Fastback

A 1951 Studebaker fastback might not be the first vehicle to come to mind when we think "Woody," but here one sits on the SEMA show floor. There's a reason for that: Studebaker didn't make a woody or a fastback in 1951, according to Hot Rod. Hill's Rod & Custom came up with the creation, hired a professional to design it and took on the challenge to build it.

The project had its ups and downs, and at one point it went up for auction before the shop could finish it. But one of its customers made the winning bid and took the car back to have it finished. It features and eyebrow-raising, 390-cubic-inch Ford Edsel V8 with an intriguing induction system, and Hill's had Art Morrison build a custom chassis for it.

We're just glad the machine was finished because it stands out as one of those rare, ultra-customized creations that somehow manages to look like it just rolled off the factory assembly line. Be sure to head over to the photo gallery to check it out and below for the press release.
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1951 Studebaker Fastback Woody by Hill's Rod & Custom

Here is a sneak peak at a customer's Studebaker project. This car was professionally designed and started, but the project stalled and the car went up for auction. Our customer picked it up and brought it over for finishing.

The Chassis was a mess, so rather than start over from scratch, we decided to go with a Hill's spec'd chassis from Art Morrison. After hanging the body on the frame, we got to work on the floors. From there, the custom intake was tweaked for the 390 FE engine. Note that this crazy induction system was on a Hot Rod cover back in the 1959 and found it's way to our customer's car. It should prove pretty interesting to drive; we'll have more on the engine later.

Other custom fabrication has included our own exhaust system, custom headers and hand fabricated transmission tunnel, stock surge tank with custom water lines to incorporate thermostate and cooling system and much more.