Even in today's world, where 200-mile-per-hour cars are somewhat common, actually hitting that speed is nearly impossible due to pesky things like traffic and, you know, the law. This difficulty in joining the 200-mph club is made more frustrating by this video, discovered by the blokes at Top Gear magazine, which shows a "toy" tether car easily crack the 200-mph barrier.

Using an aerodynamically shaped car - you can just barely see it at the bottom of the lead image - with its own little engine, the car is tied to a pole and sent around a banked circular track. At top speed, the little monster pulls 91 Gs, or nearly four times the G-force needed to kill the average human being (25 Gs, although, there are cases of people surviving much higher G-forces). For comparison, a Bugatti Veyron at wide-open throttle pulls an estimated 1.55 Gs from a stand still.

Take a look below for what may be the fastest toy we've ever seen.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 45 Comments
      Beast
      • 1 Year Ago
      Cool to see that T-cars made it on here. I'm a builder of these cars so here's the scoop...The "wire" is actually a solid strand of piano wire attached to a bearing on the pole. The guy in holding the wire is actually horsing the car around until it gets up enough speed to continue on it's own then he jumps up on to the small platform. The guy pushing the car to start it is usually the "driver", he stands behind a concrete barrier to protect him. When he feels the car is at about max speed he starts the timer for a five lap average. Once the five laps are completed he holds a broom down which trips a wire connected to a mechanical fuel shut-off. Not much sense in watching the car as once it goes over 100 mph you can't even see it so you watch the clock. Safety is number one with these cars as a 7 pound car at these speeds weighs about 500 pounds so there is no way to hold on to it. The sport started in the USA back in the '30's with a track in almost every major city. Sadly now there are only three tracks left in the USA plus a portable track, the track is 70 feet in diameter. Go to the American Miniature Racing Association ( AMRCA ) website for locations and more info.
        Agilis
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Beast
        Thank you for the explanation. It was awesome to watch and found it both entertaining and educational.
      Robt
      • 1 Year Ago
      Brandon: Your comment re human ability to withstand G forces is somewhat incorrect. I think you are confusing a single event G force (i.e. a car crash) with sustained G forces, such as those mentioned in the video. In a sustained situation, let's say about a minute, 15G is pretty much the limit and will almost certainly kill you.
        Louis MacKenzie
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Robt
        Also depends on which direction the G is going. Sustained 5+G in vertical (Head to toe) can kill a person by interfering with the blood circulation.
      Jason
      • 1 Year Ago
      Would be really neat to see onboard shots from a gopro mounted on/in one of these things.
      Agilis
      • 1 Year Ago
      For anyone confused... The job of the person standing in the center is to hold the cable/wire attached to the car, above the ground for a few laps. They do this until enough centrifugal force is available to hold the cable/wire off the ground. Then the person jumps onto a stand above the device that allows the wire to pivot/rotate. Don't ask me what happens of the person falls and the wire hits them. Whatever happens, it's not good.
      Hajime1990 #follow
      • 1 Year Ago
      ive lived for forty some years and ive never heard nor seen such thing before...
      jebibudala
      • 1 Year Ago
      What the F just happened?!?! And where'd that guy in the center go? Did he eventually have to play jump rope?
      Ron
      • 1 Year Ago
      Tethered cars and boats have been around for a long time. The boats were running 100+ MPH long before theri R/C counterparts have been. AB, the smoke is from the fuel mixture, nitro with methanol and usually two lubricants, castor and synthetic.
      Joseph
      • 1 Year Ago
      Amazing!!!
      Eddy A
      • 1 Year Ago
      Not going to lie; that was pretty amazing.
        Eddy A
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Eddy A
        Here's a related video. It explains these little cars a little more. The dude in the middle wasn't spinning around the whole time. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=555aeQlPprY
      fabulous71
      • 1 Year Ago
      James Bond in the G-Force machine in Moonraker.
      James Rockhill
      • 1 Year Ago
      So let me get this straight.....If that guy holding the string gets dizzy and stops, the cord wraps around him at 200 MPH until the car wacks him in the forehead?
        • 1 Year Ago
        @James Rockhill
        [blocked]
      poopoohead100
      • 1 Year Ago
      I was hoping the camera would pan back and show the guy in the middle spinning around at ridiculous speeds.
        Agilis
        • 1 Year Ago
        @poopoohead100
        You should learn to read through the comments. Who knows, you might come across an answer to one of your questions.
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