Germany-based Bosch will install wireless charging stations at the homes of Nissan Leaf and Chevrolet Volt drivers for about $3,000 each, implying that a wireless system is worth about $2,500 in convenience compared to cord systems, Plug In Cars says.

Bosch Automotive Service's installation of the 240-volt station, which will be made by Evatran, will include a wall unit, floor charger and vehicle adopter. The system allows wireless "induction" charging between a floor pad and a vehicle adapter. Bosch Power Max recently announced a conventional home charging system that costs $449. Bosch says it's developing wireless charging systems for other models as well, and is offering financing options that stretch for as far as five years.

Since early last year, Evatran has been joining up with public and private partners to get its Plugless Power wireless some notoriety. Last September, it reached an agreement with both Google and the Los Angeles Deptartment of Water and Power to test the wireless charging systems.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 48 Comments
      Dave D
      • 2 Years Ago
      OK, what did you guys do with Dan? There is no WAY this article came out with one of his favorite hot button issues and he's not on here talking about how expensive and unnecessary this is! LOL
      nbsr
      • 2 Years Ago
      There are two vastly different inductive wireless charging methods: - inductive coupling - short range, needs precise alignment or transfered power drops dramatically, uses ferrite cores guiding magnetic flux, may use some (mild) resonant techniques for impedance matching etc. It works, it is robust to environmental conditions, can transfer a lot of power, leaks little magnetic flux and produces little EM radiation. - resonant power transfer - used for transferring power over a longer distance (up to a coil diameter). In principle, it is an inductive coupling with strong (high-Q) LC resonance boosting magnetic fields on both sides of the link ~100x. So if you want to transfer 1kW of power, ~100kW of power is continuously being exchanged between a coil and a capacitor. All of this without any shielding as any ferromagnetic or conductive material nearby would destroy the high-Q resonance. Based on marketing data (interestingly, they never give straight specs) the Bosch/Evatran solution is somewhere in between. But if it can transfer power over a distance of at least 1 inch, it is enough to raise serious EM compatibility and safety concerns. As for efficiency, the losses (10%, likely best case) are not necessarily a problem assuming they all go into heating. But even 1% power lost on radiation would be disastrous - at several kW that's tens of watts of continuously radiated RF power. Robustness is another issue - these solutions are extremely sensitive to alignment (inductive coupling) or everything else (resonant power transfer). All the above would be fine for a cell phone charger, but we are talking about a charger that is supposed to be 1000x more powerful. This is yet another "battery swapping" or "hydrogen car" solution. At first look it seems attractive, especially for us - people desperately looking for magic bullets. Ultimately, though, the solution will come from economy and boring technological improvements in (most likely) battery and hybrid technology.
        Marco Polo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @nbsr
        @ nbsr Wireless charging is not a magic bullet ! Nor does anyone think so, it's just a more convenient method of charging. Every time any new technology is introduced, the scaremongers and conspiracy theorists get busy. In 1964, a satirical Brigadier General Jack D. Ripper, explained how "Fluoride will sap your precious bodily fluid's", but there are anti-fluoride campaigners still exist. The advent of the microwave oven, had earnest opponents explaining that it was more deadly than the A bomb ! Mobile phones would fry your brain, some TV's were marketed with an extra pain of glass to save the viewer from 'radiation'. etc etc. But in the end, these every day appliances, become just that, every day appliances.
          DarylMc
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          Hey Thats one of my favorite movie lines :)
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          @ nbsr Another explanation of why there is no "flood' of information on why it's not a problem, is that only a very small fringe element believe there is any problem. The manufacturers, have no wish to give any publicity or credence to paranoia. That's not to say your concern isn't genuine and sincere, and research should continue into all the safety aspects, of any new technology.
          nbsr
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          Marco: Yes, wireless charging is only about convenience. There are some people hoping that one day public chargers will be wireless, perhaps even charging cars in motion, though. This will not happen. Not only because of technical feasibility - there are simply better and cheaper ways of addressing the range issue. As for scaremongering - I did my share of work on wireless charging (at 10^3-10^6 times lower power). All I can only say is I do not see a way of transferring >100W of power over an air-gap larger than 10% of coil diameter that is robust and safe. Note that there are no other consumer devices in use generating this amount of unshielded EM field over an extended period of time. We should be flooded with information on why it is not the problem. Yet, we are only getting vague and/or questionable marketing claims. Less hype, more numbers and transparency, please.
        DarylMc
        • 2 Years Ago
        @nbsr
        Hi nbsr You seem to know a bit about the topic. My guess is that it runs under 50kHz but I dont know much about any risks in that range. I am sure the charger passes EMI standards and therefore I would be confident to use it.
      Reggie
      • 2 Years Ago
      Should kill off all the vermin in the garage.
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      If you will take lodgers.....;-)
      Reggie
      • 2 Years Ago
      Would have to wait a while before l ever considered such a powerful wireless device, till it proven there is no link to cancer, brain damage, memory loss & sleep problems. http://www.bioinitiative.org/report/wp-content/uploads/pdfs/BioInitiativeReport2012.pdf
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Reggie
        Buses in Italy have been running wirelessly for over a decade, and so far there are no reports of dead Italians littering the streets! ;-) So it is not brand-new technology, but one we have experience on, and strict standards are in place on electromagnetic radiation from them - microwave ovens etc mean that we know a lot about how strict we need to be. The link you give however is a serious one - I was caught by surprise in this forum! In my view it is impossible for a non-expert to adjudicate issues at that depth. If the perils are as great as the author's claim, then not only wirelessly charging cars, but much of our present electrical infrastructure including power lines would have to be drastically altered, in an upgrade costing many, many hundreds of billions. Now maybe they are right, but until the relevant bodies make such a judgement, and there is sweeping reform on the whole issue, I would not be prepared to let such concerns become a show-stopper. It is reassuring that the great increase in exposure to electromagnetic forces since the beginning of the 20th century has coincided with an unprecedented increase in life expectancy. So the additional impact on mortality, if any, is plainly limited. If perfect safety is demanded, then technology would become entirely static, which in itself in a world of rapidly increasing population would be enormously dangerous. So as far as I am concerned EMR is something to keep and eye on, not a good enough reason to curtail wireless charging.
      SLT
      • 2 Years Ago
      First comment
      raktmn
      • 2 Years Ago
      I can't see me buying one for my own use. But if it is what it would take to get my wife to agree to drive an EV or PHEV, then I'd buy one.
      Marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is a pretty astonishing advance for Bosch and Evatran who only two years ago were hoping to launch such a product in 2015. Seen as an optional extra to the car, $3000 is quite a lot. However, in the context of an improvement to a house, it's only a small investment. There will be those EV owners, (like manual transmission drivers) who will regard induction charging as an necessary luxury, or a challenge to their manhood. The" I'd only buy it for ' the wife'", school of thought. ( implying that a woman is incapable of mastering the highly technical art of an electric plug ! Although, strangely enough, she seems to master the vacuum cleaner ! ) . I love the idea of induction charging, especially as the technology has improved to involve less than 2% of power loss. Inductive charging is all about convenience, safety, and idiot proof operation. It allows those unfamiliar with EV's to correctly charge the battery with confidence. This is a huge benefit to the advancement of EV adoption The three thousand dollars, includes installation, and should drop in price with large scale usage.
        DarylMc
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marcopolo
        Hi Marcopolo After reading as much as I could on the pluginnow web site and noting the lack of actual efficiency specs I am sceptical of any 2% claim. They do however provide this figure "Input/Output Power: 3.6kW / 3.3 kW" which leads me to believe that there is nearly 10% loss. There is no input vs output figures for their wired chargers so I cannot comment on what the losses would be. If anyone knows some actual losses for a wired system I would appreciate if they can provide some links. The manufacturer should be providing the efficiency information and when they dont it leads me to believe they are trying to hide something. Others have pointed out its probably not so hard to plug in an EV. But many people dont want to, or dont even know how to check their oil, water and tyres on any sort of regular basis so I also think wireless charging will be very popular.
          DarylMc
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DarylMc
          I might have sounded critical but I think its best they put the figures out there. That they have managed to get the efficiency they have across a 10cm gap defies everything I thought I knew about electromagnetism. The product seems well integrated for an aftermarket item and the installation arrangements look very professional. All at a price we can only dream of in Australia.
          DarylMc
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DarylMc
          Hi DaveMart I imagine you have done some reading on inductive charging. But while I was reading up on how inductive charging works I found this reasonable explanation here. http://www.qualcomm.com/media/documents/files/inductive-power-transfer-systems-ipt-fact-sheet-no-1-basic-concepts.pdf
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DarylMc
          @ DarylMc, I think from memory, the estimation of 2% was a contrast between plug-in and wireless, all systems have some leakage. The old system induction charging systems we built, lost 8-12% overall. (More, in certain weather conditions and locations). However, it's reasonable to suppose that Bosch would be able to produce a much more sophisticated system. The loss output is difficult to assess, so what you maybe assuming is "hiding something' may just be a reluctance to try to quantify the unquantifiable ! But, you're quite right, people seeking convenience, are quite willing to accept minor performance drawbacks.
          DarylMc
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DarylMc
          Hi DaveMart Yeah seems I may have been a bit too skeptical. Being an electrician I see it over and over again with various claims for energy efficient products. eg Philips CF lamps with the large 12W = 60W. Then in fine print underneath "not actually equivalent"
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DarylMc
          Thanks for the link, Daryl. Not being any kind of engineer, I am unclear of what the difference, if any, is between magnetic resonant charging and inductive charging. Anyway, the bit that stands out from your link is this, talking about on the move charging: 'Any dynamic IPT system will need to meet these criteria with overall efficiency of up to 85% or more, at power transfer levels of 10-30 kW or larger. Lower dynamic power transfer efficiency is not restrictive as there is an efficiency gain of more than 15% by powering the motor directly rather than supplying power via a battery with the associated battery losses.' That is colossal for electric highways! One issue which they mention which I am not at all concerned about is lane wandering causing misalignment. Automated driving is proceeding at such a pace that it seems clear that cars will be able to keep in lane automatically, and the charge pads can certainly communicate with the car to assist this. If we imagine the first electric highways as 3-5 years out, cars should be able to be built to do this within this timeframe. To refresh your memory, here is an earlier thread here on wireless charging: http://green.autoblog.com/2011/12/04/future-nissan-leaf-could-be-cheaper-may-have-more-range-wil/ Ine's comments on transformer losses being minimised is particularly valuable IMO. It seems clear that for wired or wireless charging, we are in the ballpark of 80% efficiency, and for the electric highway, 85%!
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DarylMc
          Hi Daryl. Charging an EV by wire is quite lossy anyway. Here are the figures from one guy who measured it from the wall, and according to his Leaf: http://www.plugincars.com/economy-efficiency-nissan-leaf-my-experience-after-3-months.html That is a 20% hit overall. When the engineers are designing the wired system, I would imaging rather than concentrating on saving what is a few cents a day, which might entail using more expensive materials and so on, they were focussed mainly on making sure that excess heating does not occur, which only indirectly reduces losses. What wired charging is likely to be in respect of efficiency, is a 'good enough' solution. Since as you highlighted, some of the steps are avoided by using wireless, and the engineers will be focussed not only on avoiding excess heating, but also reducing stray electromagnetic radiation, and the currently higher price of inductive/magnetic resonant charging gives them greater leeway in materials used and so on, I find it quite credible that only small additional losses are incurred. In any case, the losses appear to be 'good enough' in engineering and economy terms, and certainly small in relation to, for instance, the 2/3rds losses incurred at the power station in generating the electricity.
        raktmn
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marcopolo
        Wow Marco, you are being especially dickish today. Only you would think that trying to reach out to people who doesn't get into electric cars as their hobby (like my wife) by making it easier for them to charge an EV, would be an insult. No wonder you are still single, and will be for the rest of your life. You consider reaching out to someone you love who isn't interested in your same hobbies, as an insult to them. And only you would be so ignorant to think that the choice to plug in or use a wireless charger had anything to do with "manhood"!! Where do you get that ignorant crap? Do you have anything to support that, or did you just pull that turd straight out of your backside because you though it was a nice backhanded way of trying to attack me? Funny you didn't even have the courage to directly respond to my post below, not man enough? PS - I do the vacuuming in my house. I actually find it rather enjoyable. What backwards sexist problem do you have that you automatically assume my wife does the vacuuming?
          EZEE
          • 2 Years Ago
          @raktmn
          @rak Semi-finalist... Actually, she has expressed an interest in another woman in the sack, but the one we talked to (rather attractive blonde) was full on lesbian. I offered to hold the camera (I try to be helpful) but it never went down. Gotta give Marco's late wife some credit for turning him to the green side. The person who got me into looking at other sides was a German girl I dated in the military. She was full on green (read their platform and beliefs - in some ways, they make communists seem mild), and got me started looking at that side more closely. The Miss Illinois gf is big into organic food, the environment, horses, outdoors, etc. So I am a somewhat green, organic food eating, horseback riding, radical right wing extremist. As an aside, the left needs to reach out to the right wingers on one side. Solar, wind, and organic foods. Many think the world is coming to an end (societal collapse) so they are huge on solar, wind, and self sustainability. Obviously they don't agree with your views on government, but the green side fits right in. Yes, not on topic, but rather interesting...
          raktmn
          • 2 Years Ago
          @raktmn
          EZEE -- I couldn't tell you what marco's personal history is, all I know is that he mentioned not being married. You will have to ask him.
          raktmn
          • 2 Years Ago
          @raktmn
          PS - How is the beauty queen runner-up? Gotten her to join any of your threesomes yet?
          Marco Polo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @raktmn
          @ Pr/raktmn, WTF ? What an incredible rant ! I wasn't actually referring to you. The reference was intended as generalised comment about a certain type of individual who ....., ah, I see,...you obviously identified yourself.... Don't be so paranoid ! Not everything is about you personally ! You really should try to take things a little less personally, it would also help you avoid indulging in gratuitously abusive tirades against those with whom you disagree ! But since you expressed such interest, I've been married twice. I have two sons (and grand children) by my first marriage, (amicable annulment), and a daughter (18) from my second wife of 14 years. ( widower). It was my late wife who created my interest in environmental issues. She was a passionate supporter of all things green and a very charismatic advocate for progressive causes. We met during a rowdy demonstration by student protesters, intent on disrupting the AGM of a mining company I was attending as a shareholder. I rescued her from arrest by two young and enraged police officers, who were mollified by my conservative attire, and ex-army officer authoritative manner. ( probably thought I was her father ! :) She wasn't happy at being separated from her fellow student demonstrators, and spent the next 14 years telling me so ! ( She also never lost her passion for social justice, or the environment) My daughter inherited her mother's good looks, but has my more pragmatic personality. PS- I do not enjoy vacuuming, or any form of housework ! I'm fortunate to have sufficient skills in other areas, so i can afford to pay people to perform this work with an expertise and satisfaction, I lack. (Curiously, I enjoy these tasks when sailing).
          EZEE
          • 2 Years Ago
          @raktmn
          'Dickish'. LOL and to you, your marriage is worth $3,000! (Hat tip Neil Cavuto) Now...marco being single....uhm...I think he might have been married, if I remember correctly...so if what happened might have actually happened....that reference might not be cool...
      DarylMc
      • 2 Years Ago
      Found a link for the efficiency. http://www.pluglesspower.com/questions-answers/technical-specifications/efficiency/
        DarylMc
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DarylMc
        "Plugless Power™ wireless EV charging systems bring that technology to your electric vehicle. Using high-frequency AC power, the transmitting coil in the parking pad creates the electromagnetic field. The vehicle adapter (the receiving coil) outputs 400V DC electricity directly to the car’s on-board battery charger – safely and efficiently." This step up and rectification may save a conversion in the onboard charger and narrow the gap.
      Jmaister
      • 2 Years Ago
      tumor is growing somewhere...
        DarylMc
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jmaister
        Its probably a lot safer than petroleum products.
        Reggie
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jmaister
        Laptop WIFI is nuking sperm, 1 in 6 Americans now have fertility problems. In a report in the venerable medical journal Fertility and Sterility, Argentinian scientists describe how they got semen samples from 29 healthy men, placed a few drops under a laptop connected to the Internet via Wi-Fi and then hit download. Four hours later, the semen was, eh, well-done. A quarter of the sperm were no longer swimming around, for instance, compared to just 14 percent from semen samples stored at the same temperature away from the computer. And nine percent of the sperm showed DNA damage, three-fold more than the comparison samples. http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/11/28/us-laptop-sperm-idUSTRE7AR2FO20111128 Maybe they should give all those damm wabbits a laptop, and every Chinese household a wireless laptop and Volt/Leaf EV charger, with no children it cuts the population down, and if a sterilised Chinese population was cut in half, it would cut their pollution/gasoline consumption in half everybody is a winner with WIFI, with tumours as well.
          DarylMc
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Reggie
          Hi Reggie I read the Reuters article headlined "Laptop Wi-Fi said to nuke sperm, but caveats abound" But I think we both got something different out of it. Im sure its worth investigating and deciding what you think is safe enough. Given that the efficiency of the units is quite high I doubt there would be a lot of electromagnetic radiation energy leaking out. As per the sperm experiment it is affected by distance. Also the frequency is much much lower than wifi. The Qualcomm document I linked elsewhere has some details of things like frequencies which would give some ideas of what inductive charging is. http://www.qualcomm.com/media/documents/files/inductive-power-transfer-systems-ipt-fact-sheet-no-1-basic-concepts.pdf and a safety statement from the manufacturer of the charger above http://www.pluglesspower.com/questions-answers/technical-specifications/safety/
          raktmn
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Reggie
          As was already mentioned, proximity matters. The strength drops logarithmically with distance. Lesson? Don't leave your gentleman parts sitting on top of that charging circle for those 4 hours while your car charges that damaged the semen in that experiment. I think I can manage to avoid that, if I put enough effort into it. I mean, normally I hang out for 4 hours just lying under my car with my balls on a small pedestal. But I suppose if I had to I could break that habit. It is sort of like my strategy to avoid getting burned up in a Volt fire after an accident. I'm going to have to give up my normal habit of staying strapped for weeks into a car that has been in a major accident. Normally I stay in the vehicle for weeks while the car is left upside down with fluids dripping out of the vehicle, but if I bought a Volt, I think with enough hard work and training, I could break that habit.
          EZEE
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Reggie
          WTF? I mean... WTF? Argentinian scientists did what? I won't say I am not above some Internet porn, but...on the computer with the wifi? I am glad the other lefties slapped that down because.... I mean...WTF?
          Ele Truk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Reggie
          I wonder if it really is WiFi or just the added heat in proximity to very heat sensitive body parts?
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is good news, as before public chargers can be wireless, the cars have to be equipped to use them. Public wireless charging is a big deal, as it will mean that people can just slide into a parking space, and get a crafty 15 minutes charge whilst they pop in the shops. No-one would bother if they had to plug in and out. 15 minutes might not allow much charging at the moment, but the Zoe, for instance, if wireless could match its 22 kw facility would take on board 5kwh or so, enough for maybe another 20 miles. Well worth having. The classic mom and the kids would be helped too. One, arm for the shopping, another for the kids, another to unplug the car.....you get the idea. There are also a lot of areas in Europe and Asia where having cables just is not practical - there is not enough space, and vandalism is an ever present risk, as is tripping over cables. Charging infrastructure safely and conveniently enabling longer range whilst reducing costs through exposed infrastructure being damaged sounds good to me.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        At the moment the ones for cars are 3.3 kw. However they have gone higher for buses, although of course you don't have the size limitations there. This link discusses charging at 20-30kw though: http://www.qualcomm.com/media/documents/files/inductive-power-transfer-systems-ipt-fact-sheet-no-1-basic-concepts.pdf So it is not physically impossible. For home charging, which is what Bosch are starting to sell now, 3.3kw is enough and can easily be wired into a home. From the link it sounds as though powerful level 3 wireless charging can be done for public locations.
        Ele Truk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        These things are good for only 3.3kw, so the same as the older Leaf onboard chargers, which take 8 hours to fully charge the 24KWh battery. So 15 minutes would give you about .8 kwh energy, with the Leaf's 250Wh/mile that's about 3 miles. So the question is can they make something more powerful? Otherwise paying another $2000 to not have to spend 10 seconds a day plugging in is not something I would pay extra for.
      KenZ
      • 2 Years Ago
      $2,500 in convenience, and likely a few thousand extra dollars over the car lifetime in less efficient charging.
        ElectricAvenue
        • 2 Years Ago
        @KenZ
        Unlikely. I spent $100 on electricity for the Leaf last year. I only drive a little over 500 miles per month, however, and I'm quite efficient, and electricity is relatively cheap here, but still: I'll bet most Leaf owners spend less than $500 per year on electricity. Even a 10% loss would only amount to $50 per year.
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @ElectricAvenue
          The Plugless Power technology has achieved over 90% efficiency as measured from your home’s 208/240V electrical outlet to your vehicle’s existing on-board battery charger.
          Marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @ElectricAvenue
          @ KenZ You're a little out of date. The latest induction charging facilities suggest less than 2% loss. Even with a big EV like mine, that would still only be a hundred dollars or so over ten years.
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