Toyota announced today that it has reached a settlement with the Attorneys General of 29 states and one US territory that will resolve their complaints relating to recalls performed by the automaker from 2005-2010, including those related to sticky accelerators and malfunctioning floor mats that may have contributed to cases of unintended acceleration.

The settlement includes a payout of $29 million to be divided among the states and US territory, as well as a commitment from Toyota "to take steps to make vehicle information more easily accessible to consumers to help them operate their vehicles safely and make more informed choices." The settlement also has Toyota continuing its rapid-response service teams and quality field offices that were put in place shortly after the largest of the recalls from 2010, as well as a "range of customer care amenities for owners of vehicles subject to certain recalls," though the press release below isn't specific about what those amenities might be.

This settlement marks the second major step in the last few months that Toyota has taken to settle legal disputes surrounding the unintended acceleration recalls, the first being a $1.4 billion settlement to address economic loss suffered by owners of current and past Toyota vehicles that may have lost value on account of these recalls.
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Toyota Resolves U.S. State Attorneys General Inquiry, Commits to Extend and Expand 'Customer-First' Initiatives

NEW YORK, NY February 14, 2013 – Toyota Motor North America announced today that it has reached a settlement agreement with the Attorneys General of 29 states and one U.S. territory to resolve issues related to recalls conducted by the company from 2005 to 2010.

In response, Christopher P. Reynolds, group vice president and general counsel, Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A, and chief legal officer, Toyota Motor North America, said:

"Resolving this inquiry is another step we are taking to turn the page on legacy issues from Toyota's past recalls in a way that benefits our customers. Immediately after this inquiry was launched in 2010, Toyota began cooperating fully with the Attorneys General and implementing 'customer-first' initiatives to address their concerns and those of our customers. Today, we are pleased to have reached a cooperative agreement that reflects the commitment of Toyota's 37,000 North American team members to put customers first in everything we do."

In the agreement, Toyota has committed to take steps to make vehicle information more easily accessible to consumers to help them operate their vehicles safely and make more informed choices. Toyota also agreed to continue other customer-focused initiatives, including its rapid-response service teams, its expanded network of product quality field offices across the U.S., and a range of customer care amenities for owners of vehicles subject to certain recalls.

As part of this settlement, which the company announced the TMC Board had approved in December 2012, Toyota will pay $29 million, to be divided among the states and the territory participating in the agreement.


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  • 38 Comments
      Mbukukanyau
      • 2 Years Ago
      Man , that was cheap
        marv.shocker
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Mbukukanyau
        Cheap? Really? I think $29 million is a lot of money to pay out to a bunch of ambulance chasers seeking "compensation" for bullshit claims...but whatever
          SAMc
          • 2 Years Ago
          @marv.shocker
          Yep, $29MM shake-down for mostly BS copy-cat claims proven false by vehicle\'s black box.
      Klinkster
      • 2 Years Ago
      This news is nothing new. If you review the legal statement from the $1.1B settlement back in December 2012, it clearly indicates it includes the settlement to the states attorneys. At best, this is a clarification that $29M of the $1.1B goes to the US States. Frankly $29M is less than pocket change to make the US States simply go away - and the fact that they settled for such an insignificant amount should lead people to believe that the Government knew it had no case but would hammer away at their 'dead horse' of a case in hopes of a settlement. Because we all know that Government is good at publicly dragging it's heals until it gets a win.
      styxmiko
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'm surprised these people are still in business...there is not ONE MONTH without a toyota or lexus recall...Are there still idiots out these willing to buy these dangerous contraptions, looking like losers in their appliance rikshaws, not to mention the stigma attached to owning such a POS. Well to each its own, people can do what they want with their hard earned money, even if they spend it irresponsibly
        • 2 Years Ago
        @styxmiko
        [blocked]
          404 not found
          • 2 Years Ago
          He's just trolling. I can't imagine anyone taking him seriously.
        R S
        • 2 Years Ago
        @styxmiko
        I am suprised they let you post still!
          mikoprivat
          • 2 Years Ago
          @R S
          so according to you, anybody who dares to speak the truth about toyota\'s low quality, unreliable and dangerous cars, should be banned from this blog...wow you must be writing from North Korea, to utter such nonsens and ignorance, you poor toyota owner. I would be miserable too if I would own a toyota
      DarkKnight67
      • 2 Years Ago
      Get it right people, you don\'t pay out that kind of change if you didn\'t do something wrong.
        Famsert
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DarkKnight67
        Oh give me a break. I've already posted the link to it a dozen times here but the NHTSA KNEW that Ford had more unintended accleration complaints than toyota before the media circus yet they never made a single press release about it nor did they fine Ford or drag them in front of congress, etc. You've got to be completely naive to think this whole issue was about safety.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DarkKnight67
        [blocked]
        markwimmer
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DarkKnight67
        Companies settle all the time for a variety of reasons. Toyota could have easily been tied up for decades in court and spent much more than the 1.1 billion they settled on in legal fees. By settling now they have the opportunity to take the issue out of the headlines sooner and get on with making great cars. I would hesitate reading too much into their decision or criticizing it. Unlike most automakers, Toyota has managed to pay their bills and remain profitable in very challenging times. That takes great management and a great product.
      richard
      • 2 Years Ago
      29 million? It should have been 29 billion.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @richard
        [blocked]
        markwimmer
        • 2 Years Ago
        @richard
        For what exactly? When Ford was shown to know that they had serious problems with the Pinto and made a business decision that cost lives, were they put out of business? Criminally charged? US automakers fought safety regulations at every turn. It took Tucker (among others) making safety a big issue to get the big three to take it seriously. Nothing even approaching Ford's callous disregard for life has been proven against Toyota. What has actually been PROVEN to be wrong with their cars. You always have the right to buy a different car but just because you disagree with hundreds of millions of other car owners does not mean we should put Toyota out of business.
          cpwallen
          • 2 Years Ago
          @markwimmer
          All kinds of unexplained acceleration that NO other car has had in the same quantity.
      joe
      • 2 Years Ago
      TOYOTAS SUCK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
        • 2 Years Ago
        @joe
        [blocked]
      chanonissan
      • 2 Years Ago
      and they have been penalized in australia for misleading post about leather seats, when actual they are leatherate. I like toyota but they must pay for their actions. how could you not know that when you say leather , people will not think it is real leather.
      R S
      • 2 Years Ago
      All you Toyota haters keeping posting the same thing on every Toyota article on this blog, as you post your negative comments Toyota posts record sales. I know it stings, but get over it! Hop into your \"whatever\" and say \"God, I am so smart\" !
      ga7smi
      • 2 Years Ago
      petty cash - the Toyota recalls were primarily payment to help the so called American brands recover - nothing wrong with Toyotas - I would not buy one - there are better cars, none "American"
        kontroll
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ga7smi
        I would not buy a toyota either, there are better cars, all "AMERICAN"
      riserburn99andre
      • 2 Years Ago
      Nothing to see here! The great and powerful OZ will wipe all our memories now!
      chanonissan
      • 2 Years Ago
      @V8eater they did say the fault was with supplier in china. probably refering to the cars in china and europe.
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