Mercedes-Benz has added the E400 Hybrid to the E-Class range for the 2013 model year, and we've now learned that the gasoline-electric sedan will be priced from $55,800, (*)not including $905 for destination. The E400 Hybrid originally debuted at the 2012 Detroit Auto Show earlier this year.

The E400 Hybrid comes packed with a 3.0-liter V6 direct-injection engine good for 302 horsepower and 273 pound-feet of torque, supplemented by an electric motor (rated at 27 hp and 207 lb-ft). Official fuel economy ratings haven't been released for the E400 Hybrid just yet, but preliminary data (and the big ol' number on the side of the car) suggests 24 miles per gallon in the city, 32 mpg highway and 27 mpg combined.

Hybrids not your thing? Never fear – Mercedes-Benz will also sell you the less-expensive E350 Bluetec ($52,200, not including destination) that packs a 3.0-liter turbo-diesel V6 good for 210 hp and 410 lb-ft. The 2013 E350 Bluetec hasn't officially been certified by the EPA just yet, but the 2012 model was rated at 21 mpg city and 32 mpg highway (25 combined), and we don't expect those numbers to change.


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  • 31 Comments
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      ljcwatson
      • 2 Years Ago
      2013 E350 Bluetec which is arriving in Los Angeles this week supposedly can't be delivered to us in Oregon until October due to some EPA review/certification. What is this about?
      Mikeavelli
      • 2 Years Ago
      GS hybrid offers 31 MPG average for the same price
      Alex
      • 2 Years Ago
      Meh... Yet another "Hey EPA, we do hybrid cars too!!! Now get off our back!!!" - type of car...
      Maddoxx
      • 2 Years Ago
      Infiniti Hybrid still beats it in every important category.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Maddoxx
        [blocked]
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      desinerd1
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's cute that Benz is trying to catch up to Toyota. Now they are only 10 years behind. I would rather get a Lexus GS Hybrid or Infiniti M Hybrid over this. I prefer cars that last more than 50000 miles.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @desinerd1
        [blocked]
          SatinSheetMetal
          • 2 Years Ago
          Your personal experiences don't mean **** compared to global averages. German cars are riddled with problems with their electronics and Japanese cars are applauded for their reliability. Like it or not that is the way it is.
      bouljf
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hey Autoblog, when you wrote “packed with a 3.0-liter V6 direct-injection engine good for 302 horsepower and 273 pound-feet of torque” I’m guessing you meant 3.5 right?
      Worx2749
      • 2 Years Ago
      Maybe it's the light, but is that Mercedes' new Sh**-Brindle Brown hue?
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Worx2749
        [blocked]
      Richard
      • 2 Years Ago
      Can someone explain why diesels aren't quicker with all of that torque? Torque = twist = twisting the wheels = acceleration, right?
        Pinhead
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Richard
        Because the torque goes through a transmission. Thus, the car with more HP generally puts more torque to the wheels at a given vehicle speed, since it is geared down more.
        seanleeforever
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Richard
        wrong... torque is a force, hp is a unit of power. you cannot say a 300 lb ft of torque is quicker than a 300 hp.. that's like saying a 5 ft tall guy is faster than a 80 lb guy. engine torque and engine hp are linked. torque x rpm x constant = hp. that hp is then converted by your gear box to deliver wheel torque at certain speed, which is the force you feel when you accelerate. so basically at any moment of time, it is the HP that counts. HOWEVER, higher torque engine tends to produce higher HP at LOWER RPM, which gives them a great advantage when it comes to towing and low speed driving. a racing engine would normally have less than amazing engine torque but can be reved at higher rpm and thus producing large amount of HP. think F1 cars and towing trucks. F1 is be faster than towing trucks all day everyday, but at the same engine RPM (say 2000 rpm), towing truck will actually product more HP than F1 and actually be useful. so to answer your question. diesels tend to have high torque at low rpm (so a 2000 rpm diesel normally produce more HP than gas engine at the same rpm) and that's why you feel them to be more powerful because the power come in earlier. but diesel engine are limited in Rev (4k?) whereas gas engine can easily rev over 8k and produce more HP, and thus are faster if you drive it right.
        flychinook
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Richard
        If my understanding is correct (and it likely isn't, as I failed H.S. physics), you're half right. Torque does mean more powerful twist. But Horsepower is a function of torque and speed. Think of a strong man pushing a large boulder. Plenty of "grunt"... that's your torque. But it doesn't necessarily equate to speed/acceleration.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Richard
        [blocked]
      Richard
      • 2 Years Ago
      Can someone explain why diesels aren't quicker with all of that torque? Torque = twist = twisting the wheels = acceleration, right?
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