According to a report from Automotive News, Toyota is recalling more than 200,000 Sienna minivans from the 2011 and 2012 model years. But before you start worrying about reading the words 'Toyota' and 'recall' in the same sentence, know that this is for a very, very minor issue.

The problem? The tire and load information placard has been misprinted, and can cause a situation where owners over-inflate the tires. Overloaded tires can potentially fail (read: burst), and can result in a crash.

Toyota spokesperson Bryan Lyons told Automotive News that there isn't a problem with any mechanical part of the Sienna itself, just the sticker. To remedy this situation, the automaker will mail new replacement placards to affected vehicle owners.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 34 Comments
      Drew
      • 3 Years Ago
      Seems a bit sloppy.
      WillieD
      • 3 Years Ago
      I would like to know what the difference between the right and wrong pressures is. If it's 5 psi then it's probably not a big deal.
        Randy
        • 3 Years Ago
        @WillieD
        Yes it is! They call it a maximum for a reason! 5PSI over creates a very hard tires, easier to puncture, easier to bounce (such an odd feeling in a car), easier to skid, slide and so on. It even effects your perception of your suspension (harder ride). The lower the recommended PSI is, the larger percentage a 5PSI instruction would be. Example 5PSI is 11% more on my tires which inflate at 44PSI, say the car has 38PSI, it jumps to 14%. That's important not to do! If the payload on a truck is 10,000 LBS, would you add 11,400 and think it were safe? Now what I mean?
      dukeisduke
      • 3 Years Ago
      Mailing them out? They should apply them for the owners, on the service drive. I can see a lot of these getting thrown away or left in a pile somewhere, and never put on. Sure, they can offer the mail option for people who live far from a dealer, but the first option should be dealer install.
      SloopJohnB
      • 3 Years Ago
      Huh? Doesn't anyone read the max load tire pressure on the tire itself? I would ignore any stupid sticker that had higher pressures than that. And I adjust tire pressure to give even wear across the tread (tire pyrometer helps too..)
        Leather Bear
        • 3 Years Ago
        @SloopJohnB
        Don't have a tire pyrometer, but I usually set my tires 2-4 psi above the recommended pressure. I get slightly better steering response (higher pressure = stiffer sidewall?), and the outer edge of the tread doesn't wear prematurely from my exuberant driving style.
      Wolf
      • 3 Years Ago
      As I understand it, most TPMS systems will go off if a tire is over or under inflated by 10%. It seems to me that this may actually be a minor issue (the placards) because if the tires were too inflated, they would trigger the TPMS system and at least alert the driver that something is wrong. Given that the recall doesn't seem to re-calibrate the TPMS system, I'm guessing the issue here is just a misprint, not a major calamity waiting to happen.
        Danaon
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Wolf
        It's actually not due to tire safety or anything, this is an FMVSS recall. FMVSS is the federal code that all vehicles sold new in the US have to meet. It includes literally reams of specifications for everything from safety to standardized lighting and yes, tire and VIN stickers. GM had a previous recall that was basically the same as this, they had some vehicles that didn't have the right stickers so they had to recall them. It's a technicality, but one that can cost an automaker a lot of money if they don't correct.
        SloopJohnB
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Wolf
        TPMS is irrelevant in this case. The system ignores overinflation as long as all four tires are overinflated and/or the system is set to that pressure.
      Adamnski
      • 3 Years Ago
      Guess they don't want a Ford Exploder situation on their hands.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Adamnski
        [blocked]
          XT6Wagon
          • 3 Years Ago
          If by ignoring, you mean having nothing to do with.... Might do some research. The 1st gen Ford Explorer WITH the firestone rollovers has a lower roll over rate than almost all SUV's of that era, and in fact had a much lower rate than a Toyota Tercel. Firestone also had tread separation issues with many other tires. The biggest problem was thier Truck tires for heavy vehicles like fire engines. These would lose their tread in very short order leading many companies and government agencies to ban the use of Firestone tires on thier vehicles well before the exploder recall happened.
      tenspeeder
      • 3 Years Ago
      Major or minor recall. Doesn't matter. Still continued embarrassment for Toyota
      mrbrian2334
      • 3 Years Ago
      "The problem? The tire and load information placard has been misprinted, and can cause a situation where owners over-inflate the tires. Overloaded tires can potentially fail (read: burst), and can result in a crash." That's a minor issue?
      clquake
      • 3 Years Ago
      Tires bursting while driving can lead to a fiery death. I wouldn't consider this minor.
      transam
      • 3 Years Ago
      I dont consider this to be minor. Proper tire inflation is important for the overall performance and security of a vehicle. When customers can no longer trust important information printed on their vehicles by the manufacturer, this becomes a major problem, and another embarrasement for Toyota. Where is the quality control of yore.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @transam
        [blocked]
        SloopJohnB
        • 3 Years Ago
        @transam
        That's only if you consider proper inflation to be that printed on the car by the OEM. FWIW, proper inflation varies by 10% or more considering what individuals want and need from their cars. If you're only commuting one to a car and never take on slugs or heavy luggage you can use less tire pressure than a fully loaded car traveling at high speeds on a long trip...both situations are not generally covered by the stickers. Tire wear is not an insignificant consideration as well...if your tires are wearing on the inside and outside edges, outside of alignment issues, you simply have too low a tire pressure for your driving environment...add air. If the tires are wearing in the center, reset to a lower pressure. It's not rocket science.
      Marc Underwood
      • 3 Years Ago
      Toyota: Your customers should be aware that this is more than a minor issue and they should heed to this. Take it from us, we made that mistake. Sincerely, Ford
        Randy
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Marc Underwood
        Correction: Firestone made the mistake! Would you blame an athlete for faulty shoes?
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
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