Karsan V1 New York City Taxi – Click above for high-res image gallery

Three manufacturers remain in the running to be the chosen supplier for New York's "Taxi of Tomorrow": Ford, Nissan and Turkish firm Karsan. In an informal poll conducted by the New York Taxi and Limousine Commission – the same body that will be deciding which of the three gets the milk and roses – New Yorkers chose the Karsan. Now Karsan wants to make the Commission's job even easier by promising to build its taxi in Brooklyn if it's chosen.

Previously, all three makers said they'd be building their vehicles overseas (the Transit Connect is built in Turkey, the Nissan NV200 in Japan). Perhaps sensing a huge opportunity to bring the four-year process to an end, last month Karsan turned tack and said it would build the V1 at the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal, in Brooklyn's waterfront Sunset Park complex, creating up to 800 jobs. It might not only be about getting ahead with the public, however: the powertrain for the Karsan V1 comes from Chrysler, in Michigan.

What the Karsan lacks in looks it makes up for in its powerplant modularity, handicapped accessibility, and expansive glass roof. Karsan has said a Sunset Park factory would cost $100 million, a pittance in light of the billion-dollar contract it's trying to win and being the yellow-cab-of-record in movies for the foreseeable future. Thanks for the tip, Julio!

[Source: New York Daily News]


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  • 24 Comments
      Rocko
      • 3 Years Ago
      While in Turkey most of the cabs I rode in were Ford Transit Connects.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Rocko
        [blocked]
        Caffeine
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Rocko
        In Turkey nearly all cabs are some FIAT models like Doble, Albea, Palio or Hyundai Era, Accent. Ford Transit models are mostly used as minibus, some sort of shared cab service.
      swimtedswim
      • 3 Years Ago
      awesome both the driver and cab can be turkish!!!
      waetherman
      • 3 Years Ago
      I think it's great that Karsan is talking about opening a plant in NYC to serve the NYC taxi market, and that they seem to understand that there is potential here for a lot more than just NYC taxis. Ultimately, this model could be used in a lot more cities, and that's potentially a huge market for a car manufacturer with no US presence. Karsan is the only one of the competitors in the taxi challenge that seemed to understand that potential and treat the challenge appropriately - most other car companies just painted an existing model yellow and called it a cab without thinking about the needs of NYC riders. Ford's entry is a joke by comparison. It's sad that no US company decided to take the challenge seriously, but I say if the best entry is also willing to make the taxis here in NYC, that makes them the winner in my book. Sign 'em up!
      Jim R
      • 3 Years Ago
      In other news, UAW chairman Bob King has already announced plans to "talk" to Turkish manufacturer Karsan about union representation in its new factory, promising to bring the same level of quality, profitability and expertise it's brought to GM, Ford and Chrysler. As a result, Karsan has now announced their new taxi will be built in a new facility just outside of Istanbul.
      BipDBo
      • 3 Years Ago
      This thing won the NYC poll for one reason, the big glass roof. It's too bad that thing is completely impractical. Aside from being expensive, heavy, and notgood in a crash, it will make the car very hot and cause the vehicle to use more gas due to the high air conditioning load. A smaller sunroof installed on a real, working vehicle like the Transit Connect would be a much better choice.
        DrEvil
        • 3 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        BipD: You have a point, not a very good one or valid one or even a real world practical one. I frequently ride taxicabs in NYC, none of the factors that you list are of a critical nature. 99.9% of all taxi cab accidents in NYC are side swipes, pedestrian related or minor fender benders in nature. The Majority of the worst vehicle accidents in NYC involve emergency vehicles. BTW: That superstructure is not a glass bubble, It has A, B, B1 and C pillars supporting it.
        Jim
        • 3 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        assuming you're talking about the roof offering crash protection, the roof *panel* is inconsequential. The strength is all in the pillars and glass/door apertures. if you're talking about it breaking in a crash, well, it's tempered (:"safety") glass so it would be no worse than breakage of the side windows or backlite in any typical car. just a bunch of un-sharp glass "pebbles" everywhere.
        Shiftright
        • 3 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        There are highly reflective coatings that filter out UV and heat very effectively, so this shouldn't be an issue. Other manufacturers have been doing this for years.
      gork
      • 3 Years Ago
      But can it meet the NHTSA's standards for side impact?
      ammca66564
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is about a likely as the DeLorean Motor Company was. Notgonnahappen.com. But expect it to consume a nice big bite of taxpayers' money on its way down the drain.
      dzspleen
      • 3 Years Ago
      Have they even built one prototype of this vehicle? Karsan keeps making pie-in-the-sky promises about their entry (glass roof, handicap-accessible, built in NYC), but they still haven't released anything more than CG renders of their vehicle. Is it really manufacturable as currently designed? Can they really build it for an affordable price in NYC? The concept of a unique NYC taxi sounds great in theory, but it would be nice to actually see a working prototype before a decision is made.
        Eric
        • 3 Years Ago
        @dzspleen
        Yes, they've built a prototype of it with a working wheelchair ramp as well. It really is sad it wasn't picked. The biggest flaw with the vehicle, that I've read from people anyways, is the roof, which would require more heating/AC than if it was a smaller sunroof. Aside from that the vehicle did have many great things. And for people mentioning the lack of a plant already in NY, with the $1 billion contract they'd have with the city they could easily build what's needed or at least get a major loan from a company since not only will they get revenue from that contract but they could sell vehicles across the nation to other places in need of handicapped capable vehicles (roughly 15,000 potential extra sales).
      JamesJ
      • 3 Years Ago
      So how useful would these sunroofs be once they place all those advertisement on top of the cab?
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
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