• May 25, 2010
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is now estimating that 89 deaths may be attributable to unintended acceleration in Toyota vehicles here in the United States between the year 2000 and May of 2009. Previously, it was reported that 52 deaths were possibly related to the throttle defect.

This figure has been extrapolated from NHTSA's database of the roughly 6,200 complaints it has received over that same time period. In addition to the 89 deaths, 57 injuries have also been tallied. Toyota reminds us that these figures are estimates, saying in a statement:
Many complaints in the NHTSA database, for any manufacturer, lack sufficient detail that could help identify the cause of an accident. We will continue to work in close partnership with law enforcement agencies and federal regulators with jurisdiction over accident scenes whenever requested.
According to Toyota, some 1.67 million sticky accelerator pedals and 1.62 million floor mats have so far been fixed under recall, with roughly 120,000 being performed per week on average.

[Source: The Washington Post | Image: Justin Sullivan/Getty]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 41 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Or "none". Because it's pretty easy to stop a car whatever the engine's doing.

      I could state 89 lives have been claimed due to drivers of Toyotas being unable to control their vehicles, and it would have more basis in fact than the headline.
        • 4 Years Ago
        So true,
        Edmunds did a very methodical test proving you can stop your car. Unintended acceleration=stupid driver, not car malfunction.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I am not one to put too much stock in an estimate, but IF (and that's the world's biggest "if") then shouldn't this constitute negligent homicide?

      (not rhetorical/serious question)
        • 4 Years Ago
        I am not one to put too much stock in an estimate, but IF they knew of this issue and failed to address it while also covering it up (and that's the world's biggest "if"), then shouldn't this constitute negligent homicide?

        (not rhetorical/serious question)

        Sorry for the double post. English fail.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Yet the fat lazy American's still are buying this crappy cars? idiot's..........
        • 4 Years Ago
        Americans work an insane amount of hours. You're the lazy one. Take your bigotry elsewhere.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Actually, the stats show that us fat lazy Americans are starting to back away from Toyota cars.

        Oh, and maybe you could try to sound a bit more intelligent next time you open your mouth.

        I mean, I'm not gonna correct your English, but damn...
        • 4 Years Ago
        Our mistake for us fat, lazy Americans for introducing you the computer and giving you the basis of the internet, and this website. Also unless you live in a third-world country that can't afford cars, Toyota sells outstanding everywhere. Sorry but people like you try to sound intelligent and troll others to make themselves feel better, but it always fails.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Being neither fat or lazy, I have driven over 1,200 Toyota products in 14 states over the last 3.5 years. Call them what you will, but I have never experienced in any of them any event I did not want to happen. And by the way, you're a tool.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Hey Mact,

      Your a true example of someone who does not no what to respond to my post with a valid argument. It's funny that you have nothing better to say than you sarcastic comment.
        • 4 Years Ago
        LOL @ foreigners who really don't understand sarcasm.. or lack of sarcasm
        • 4 Years Ago
        I'm not being sarcastic.
        • 4 Years Ago
        your*
        • 4 Years Ago
        You're**


        But anyway
        • 4 Years Ago
        Sorry Mact I thought you where, cause there are some many Toyota haters in this forum, and some not getting there facts straight.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Whatever they say, we, Americans (and Canadians) don't believe whatever the government say - Toyota will have to kill few thousand more before we start listen, till then, it's most reliable cars ever built and we trust them with our dollars and lives. (for the stupid among us, that is being said sarcastically)
      • 4 Years Ago
      Damn... i'd join in and bash on Toyota... but i'm all out of hateorade by now.

      I think this dead horse has been well-beaten. Lol..
      • 4 Years Ago
      I estimate that every human who is alive today will eventually die from something. So why is it not making headlines?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Agreed. I don't know why people don't realize that death is the number one killer of humans.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Yeah, I guess UA instances in Japan are also a part of the diabolical plot by the US govt. to take down Toyota.

      *****

      From the NYTimes...

      Her car surged forward nearly 3,000 feet before slamming into a Mercedes Benz and a taxi, injuring drivers in both those vehicles and breaking Mrs. Sakai’s collarbone.

      As shaken as she was by the accident, Mrs. Sakai says she was even more surprised by what happened after. She says that Toyota — from her dealer to headquarters — has not responded to her inquiries, and Japanese authorities have been indifferent to her concerns as a consumer.

      Mrs. Sakai says the Tokyo Metropolitan Police urged her to sign a statement saying that she pressed the accelerator by mistake — something she strongly denies. She says the police told her she could have her damaged car back to get it repaired if she made that admission. She declined.

      But veterans of Japan’s moribund consumer rights movement say that Mrs. Sakai, like many Japanese, is the victim of a Japanese establishment that values Japanese business over Japanese consumers, and the lack of consumer protections here.

      “In Japan, there is a phrase: if something smells, put a lid on it,” said Shunkichi Takayama, a Tokyo-based lawyer who has handled complaints related to Toyota vehicles.

      An examination of transport ministry records by The New York Times found that at least 99 incidents of unintended acceleration or surge in engine rotation had been reported in Toyotas since 2001, of which 31 resulted in some form of collision.

      Critics like Mr. Takayama charge that the number of reports of sudden acceleration in Japan would be bigger if not for the way many automakers in Japan, helped by reticent regulators, have kept such cases out of official statistics, and out of the public eye.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/06/business/global/06toyota.html?pagewanted=1
      • 4 Years Ago
      You and your buddy Mact could be standing at the end of a Toyota assembly line door and every car built that day could have the engine explode and all four wheels fall off and you'd still be wagging your tounge with blind lust for these crapmobiles.
      • 4 Years Ago
      It is pretty sad that even Washington Post cant get it right... NTHSA is not estimating anything and they are not validating anything. That number is from what people report themselves on NTHSA form, and anyone can write anything there in 5 minutes.

      That number was 5 before all this media frenzy started.

      What is telling is that number of deaths is bigger than number of injuries (which would be impossible to happen in real life), which comes from lawyers trying to make some money on some old accidents.

      I am glad that Jeremy lacks reading comprehension... he would be first to jump from the bridge if someone told him to.

      :-)
        • 4 Years Ago
        Because it's a lot easier to injure yourself than it is to kill yourself in a modern car. There are roughly 75 reported injuries for every traffic fatality.

        If these pedals caused 90 deaths, they would also have called many thousands of injuries.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Exactly. I said this months ago and it looks like the NHTSA isn't stopping now with providing juicy anti-Toyota propaganda for the media. Combine this with the NHTSA's comments on Toyota accepting blame (thus opening them to lawsuits) when they didn't and LaGoon telling people to stop driving their Toyotas, how can anyone NOT see that the NHTSA isn't being a little biased here?
      • 4 Years Ago
      This is ridiculous. In Iraq, the injurty to death ratio is like 10 to 1, as in most wars. This report says 89 deaths for 57 injuries, which is clearly fabricated.
      • 4 Years Ago
      To all Toyota haters: those 89 were Toyota drivers, so why does it bother you that much?
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