• Apr 15, 2008


Click above to view video after the jump

If you haven't seen BMW's M3 "Revolution" ad, then you need to do that right now. For those of you who have seen it, no doubt you were wondering how they created such stunning video without the use of CGI. Fortunately, additional cameras were on hand to film some 'behind the scenes' footage, as well as interviews with those responsible for capturing the innermost workings of the BMW M3 V8. A total of six engines were disassembled for the making of the commercial, and miniature HD cameras shooting at 4,000 frames per second were used to ensure that the internal combustion could be seen in high resolution and slow motion. The video can be seen after the jump.

[Source: YouTube via zercustoms.com]



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 10 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      that wasnt after the jump, that was a link
        • 6 Years Ago
        the link doesnt work either
        • 6 Years Ago
        i was referring to the "after the jump." hyperlink
      • 6 Years Ago
      Again, really great commercial. Props to Autoblog for posting this follow up, really interesting.
      • 6 Years Ago
      A total of six engines were disassembled for the making of the commercial, and miniature HD cameras shooting at 4,000 frames per second
      Thats today.
      They had three complete engines; The completed spot was filmed at 10,000 frames-per-second
      That was for the commercial.
      Way to have continuity, autoblog.
      • 6 Years Ago
      That was a great commercial. Makes me wanna buy one. Although. I. Won't...
      • 6 Years Ago
      There's nothing wrong with the new M3, except for its styling, which makes me cringe. The commercial is boring, and the "making of" with the producer sitting there with his legs crossed like he's on "The View" is self-indulgent and trite. I'd love to know how they cloaked the piston, because I sure don't see one in the video.