• Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin has pulled the wraps off the DB11 AMR, and the fact that it's just what we expected it'd be shouldn't diminish the impact of this ultimate (for now) DB11. But, if you're not down with AMR, a quick backgrounder for you: Early last year, Aston launched the Vantage AMR Pro and the Rapide AMR, the first salvos in a full broadside of AMR models that will encompass the entire range. There are two AMR subdivisions — AMR is handled by Aston's main design and engineering teams, while the Pros are handled by the Advanced Operations department.

History aside, the DB11 sports a 30 horsepower bump, up to 630 horsepower. Previous AMR models made power bumps with new exhaust systems, and given the DB11 AMR's exhaust revisions, we wouldn't be surprised if some of the power increase came from the exhaust side of things. More to the point, the twin-turbocharged 5.2-liter V12 now scoots the DB11 AMR to 60 mph in just 3.5 seconds, and top speed is increased to 208 MPH.

Unspecified suspension and chassis changes are claimed to deliver "a greater sense of connection without harming the supple ride," Aston claims, and we've no reason to doubt it. A new transmission calibration rounds out the dynamic changes.

On the visual side of things, there's much more exposed carbon fiber and a smattering of gloss black detailing, smoked tail lamps, and dark, monotone leather/Alcantara draped throughout the interior. It's darker, a bit harder-edged, and sportier, but very much in the vein of Aston's careful balancing act between conveying athleticism visually while maintaining a degree of traditional British comfort and decadence. The eye-popping, dayglo accents on some color combinations seem more Nike shoe than grand tourer, but that's AMR's thing.

The U.S. MSRP will be $241,000, and the cars will be delivered to owners in summer 2018. The extremely limited edition Designer Specification cars, offered in Stirling Green with lime accents, will be limited to 100 units globally and are $29,000 more. If you want one of those, you should probably get on the horn with your Aston dealer right now.

Related Video:


Share This Photo X