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  • Image Credit: Michael Harley / AOL
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Chevrolet is apparently making it harder to experience even parts of its $75,000, track-biased Camaro Z/28. The entire 500-car production run for the 2014 model year is already either sold or at least reserved by dealers. And it will be months before assembly of the roughly 2,500-car, 2015 model-year run will begin. In theory, though, couldn't someone buy the components that make the Z/28 so special from the Chevy catalog and assemble a clone? Not so fast. It seems GM is one step ahead.

According to GM Authority, the company sent a letter to dealers that limited orders on 35 individual parts that make up the Z/28 package. The list included a mix of mechanical and aesthetic components like the brakes, wheels, differential, body flares, seats, grille and even the emblems.

This is clearly a move by Chevy to protect the exclusivity of the Z/28. As you can understand, it would harm the hardcore car's reputation if a replica could be built easily from a much more basic Camaro powered by a V6. In any case, for the time being, it also means that interested buyers must negotiate for the few remaining 2014 models left, or they have to wait for the 2015s to arrive.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 54 Comments
      btulliani
      • 10 Months Ago
      Huge marketing mistake. For beginners, VIN's would be able to confirm if it's a true ZL1 and secondly wouldn't car thieves target these cars for parts? Don't you want to sell the maximum amount of parts for ANY car. Finally, what is wrong with a clone? So you can't afford a ZL1 right away and your SS becomes a work in progress. Clones are fine a long you know it's one and don't try to resell one as authentic.
        knowledgehurtsmyhead
        • 10 Months Ago
        @btulliani
        GM did the same thing years ago with the GNX. Keeps the limited runs desirable
        icemilkcoffee
        • 10 Months Ago
        @btulliani
        Agreed. selling the performance parts, does not in any way diminish the value of the real thing. Look at the muscle car market. Anyone can build a clone GTO or clone Chevelle SS or what have you. Yet the 'real deal' retains their values. Also- if you had to build up your own Z28 from spare parts, you would spend way more money than buying the factory car. Just like trying to build a STI from a regular WRX. You can't do it any cheaper than the factory has already done.
        Indubitably
        • 10 Months Ago
        @btulliani
        You wouldn't be saying any of these if you actually purchased a limited run model of any car. You're just being a troll.
        btulliani
        • 10 Months Ago
        @btulliani
        Correction Z/28......
      Jarda
      • 10 Months Ago
      how many years before we can print those on our own? 1, 3?
      Trevor
      • 10 Months Ago
      To bad german brands didn't do this. Do you know how many fake S63, S65, SL65 along with many other models I see in Socal.
      sodamninsane
      • 10 Months Ago
      you guys are missing the boat on the fact that most parts of new models are placed on restriction for the first model year so that dealers are required to contact the company before replacing them. this makes sure that the replacement is valid (IE, the part is really broken and diagnostics are correct) and that the defective parts get sent back to the engineering organizations so improvements can be made. it's not always a grab at making a model "exclusive"
      sstowes
      • 10 Months Ago
      "It would harm the hardcore car's reputation if a replica could be built easily from a much more basic Camaro powered by a V6." Sounds like the "stickers and an APC wing will add 80hp to your Neon" logic. I'm sure V6 Camaro owners were thinking exactly this way...
      jonnybimmer
      • 10 Months Ago
      Who are they kidding, Chevy needs to get over themselves and at least make a coin off of the Z28's looks. Those Z28 lookalike parts are soon going to be available for Camaro owners whether Chevy likes it or not, so might as well offer some legit dealer parts that don't ruin customer's warranties and make some money off it in the process.
      Tribesman2004
      • 10 Months Ago
      Clever... but it seems to me that *almost* everything could be duplicated from aftermarket components. Obviously, the warranty is limited to "good luck", but with the possible exception of the aero bits (for now) I can't think of anything that would be impossible to do to a non-Z/28 car.
      teknishn
      • 10 Months Ago
      I can't figure out what the point of the Z/28 is at all. I mean, hats off to the engineers for creating such an impressive track monster, but whats the point here? We know the Camaro is due for a big refresh just like the Mustang is going through. Why build this egregiously expensive Camaro on an outgoing platform that already has the ZL1 in the stable?
        cgm9999
        • 10 Months Ago
        @teknishn
        What's the point you ask? To fill a hole in the marketplace and make money. Since Chevy is selling all the Z/28s they can build - and at an unprecedented price - it's clear that market demand is outpacing supply right now. Since this is the case, I'd also argue that Z/28 isn't "egregiously" expensive - at least in economic terms. If it was, they'd be collecting cobwebs on dealer lots. According to reports, this isn't the case, though. Based on the sales, it seems to me that the buyers of the Z/28 are fans that see an investment opportunity (whether or not a garaged Z/28 will yield a profit is a whole other discussion) or people that see a budget GT3 and are avid track enthusiasts. Given the collector market that always has money for something special, the relative dearth of track-ready vehicles in the marketplace, and the stellar reviews of the Z/28 from the automotive press, I'd say GM knocked the cover off the ball with the Z/28. Also, it seems you don't fully understand the appeal of the Z/28 if you're under the impression that is serves the same purpose as the ZL1. They don't. Quite simply, these two cars have two different missions and are for two different types of people. The Z/28 is expressly built to perform well on a track, lap after lap after lap. All the modifications on the Z/28 reflect this track focus. In short, the Z/28 is a factory-built track car with a warranty. The people (at least most of them) who are buying them are paying $75k for a car that is essentially a turn key track car that can be driven to racetracks and be made to reliably perform well in such a setting. Quite frankly, for what the Z/28 is (a purpose built track car) and what it does (reliably terrorizes track days with a full warranty), $75k is not a lot of money for a car that can stand up to track abuse and do it well. The ZL1? Not so much. It's tuned for the street. That's not a knock against it, it's just that after a couple of laps, it's out of it's element. The brake pedal will go to the floor after a few hot laps. The heatsoak from the supercharger will yield diminishing power after a few full-throttle blasts on a hot track surface. It's over 300lbs. heavier than the Z/28.
        David MacGillis
        • 10 Months Ago
        @teknishn
        Money.
      AGSHOP
      • 10 Months Ago
      If it didnt have the MADE BY FISHER PRICE interior. I would so be on board. Looks great from the outside.
        • 10 Months Ago
        @AGSHOP
        [blocked]
      Yugo32
      • 3 Months Ago

      what a great 2015 Chevy Camaro,
      good job!!

      bethany.omalley
      • 10 Months Ago
      Are they restricting ignition switch parts too?
      keet
      • 10 Months Ago
      they are probably scared that people could figure out that it costs a hell of a lot less than $75k to "make" a Z/28
        Eric
        • 10 Months Ago
        @keet
        The car has damn near 10g's worth of brakes on it.
        Tourian
        • 10 Months Ago
        @keet
        I guarantee you that you can't build ANY car cheaper by assembling it through the parts department of ANY dealer.
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