The stereotype of elderly drivers preferring Lincolns and Buicks has to come from somewhere. TrueCar.com took a look at the past two years of car sales to buyers at least 65 years old and found a couple common threads. The first thing these buyers are looking for is familiarity. The nameplates and vehicle types that were popular when these buyers were younger rank high with senior buyers, kind of the same way people's musical preferences get frozen in time.

Value is also a big attractor for the senior dollar, a consideration for buyers nearing the end of their careers or already on fixed incomes. The brand names on the list may not surprise anyone, though the Cadillac and Buick brands high scores show that those divisions' push for a younger average buyer age hasn't put off longstanding customers. In fact, there are some models that owe their continued existence to this older demographic.

So which cars are they? Hit the gallery and find out.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 124 Comments
      Jay
      • 3 Years Ago
      The uber ride of the uber-seniors here in South Florida is the Mercury Grand Marquis, even though it's no longer made. You usually find them in the vinyl roof edition doing 45 in the left lane of I-95 with one turn signal flashing, in the direction of the median. Gotta love'em.
      gtv4rudy
      • 3 Years Ago
      when your parents tell you they're going on a cruise . . .they don't really mean it's on a boat
      LUSTSTANG S-197
      • 3 Years Ago
      Where's the Prius and Camry? Among the elderly in Western North Carolina, the Prius, Camry, and Dodge Caravan seem to be the vehicles of choice. Heck, some old lady in a white Camry almost backed into me yesterday morning in a parking lot.
        BB79826
        • 3 Years Ago
        @LUSTSTANG S-197
        This is about percentage, not total sales. The Prius and Camry sell in all age brackets. They're just popular cars. The Lucerne sells to practically no one, but they're all fossils.
      snap_understeer_ftw
      • 3 Years Ago
      "kind of the same way people's musical preferences get frozen in time" ain't THAT the truth
        Bunkie
        • 3 Years Ago
        @snap_understeer_ftw
        There would be less of that if today's music wasn't so depressingly awful.
        Justin
        • 3 Years Ago
        @snap_understeer_ftw
        Not necessarily a bad thing. No need to like something just because it's newer and trendy.
        tgsid
        • 3 Years Ago
        @snap_understeer_ftw
        No, It isn't the truth. I prefer classic Rock from the 70's and 80's. So basically, what my parents listened to when they were kids.
      Sukairain
      • 3 Years Ago
      "These are American senior citizens' favorite cars " and then the next blog "Google awarded patent for autonomous car mode" Hmmmmmm...... EUREKA!!
      Dvanos
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well no surprise there.
      David Blane
      • 3 Years Ago
      NO LS460?
      KaiserWilhelm
      • 3 Years Ago
      Sky is blue, grass is green, etc...
      Redline
      • 3 Years Ago
      So... the usual suspects...
      Michael C.
      • 3 Years Ago
      My grandma had a CLK320 until she totaled it. She had a 560SEC before that, and a 380SEC before that one. The other grandma has a Nissan Sentra. She had a Mercury Topaz before that.
      pinetree
      • 3 Years Ago
      Has anyone noticed that almost all of the cars on that list with a percentage above 70 have been recently discontinued? The only exception is the CTS, which has a percentage in the mid 70's.
      John
      • 3 Years Ago
      Even putting the discontinuation of the panther aside, I can't help but think that is is right on the cusp of changing. As time goes on, the GI generation that perpetuatied the "old person = large floaty American sedan" preference is rapidly vanishing, and the leading wave of Baby Boomers are getting very close to joining the 65+ ranks. They're the ones that really tended to dislike that style of car, and embraced the trend toward SUV's and Japanese makes, and so it will be interesting to see. Either their tastes will change, or else this article 10 years from now will look a good bit different.
        LUSTSTANG S-197
        • 3 Years Ago
        @John
        I suspect that Toyotas and Hondas will become the new "old people cars", and maybe SUVs/CUVs as well. Remember, it was that generation gravitated toward those types of vehicles because they did not want to feel old in the station wagons and large coupes/sedans their parents drove when they were younger. No one seems to want to drive what their parents drove at the same age.
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