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Triumph and Guy Martin hope to hit 400 miles per hour in a two-wheeled, streamlined motorcycle at the Bonneville Sale Flats in 2015.

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Every once in a while, Mother Nature has a rather tenuous relationship with her children. Such a scenario plays out each and every year as mankind clings to one of the last vestiges of open space left on our planet, the Bonneville Salt Flats, to which hundreds of men and women each year flock to take out their frustrations with the pace of life by attempting to outdo and one-up the accomplishments of those who dared make a similar attempt in years prior. It's a vicious cycle, and one that depend

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"Enjoy your toys. Don't worry about breaking them, don't worry about scratching them. Just have fun with them," says the owner of the salt-covered Mercedes-Benz Gullwing. No, it's not a new SLS AMG, but an original 300SL that Bob Sirna bought a year out of college in the early 1980s. Since 2001, it has been repurposed as a Bonneville Salt Flats racecar.

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You've probably heard of Mickey Thompson, if not for racing home-built Indy cars or punting early Funny Cars down drag strips, perhaps for the tire company he founded, his successful forays into off-road racing or, crucially, his attempts to break land speed records at the Bonneville Salt Flats. In 1960, he became the fastest man in the world after going 406 miles per hour in his race car, the brutish four-engined Challenger I, but the record was never completed and made official due to a breakd

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There are an infinite number of impressive aspects to getting a 1992 Audi to clip past the 260-mph barrier. For starters, there's the fact that Jeff Gerner managed to milk a full 1,100 horsepower from the five-cylinder S4 before shuttling the power to the ground via an all-wheel drive system without vaporizing an axle. That alone deserves a round of applause, but for us, the most awe-inspiring aspect of the feat is just how smooth and drama-free the salt flat run was.

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Ah, the Bonneville Salt flats. One of the last true bastions of speed left in America, where men and women take cars, trucks, motorcycles and just about anything else with wheels to the very limits of man and machine's capabilities.

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We hate to be the ones to tell you this, but there's a scant chance most of us will ever exceed 200 miles per hour here on planet Earth. Sure, you can hop in a commercial jet liner and easily best that figure in the comfort of coach, but its not quite the same as skimming along mere inches from the ground in an hurling ball of aluminum, glass and fury. Maybe that's what makes the Speed Demon's latest run on the salt so impressive. As you may recall, the team behind this particular Streamliner re

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What's the fastest you've ever driven? We're sure many of you have crested the century mark. Some of you may have seen 150 miles per hour crawl by on the speedo, and perhaps a lucky few have experience 200. We can all but guarantee that none of you have gone as fast George Poteet, though.

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Danny Thompson crashes at 260 miles per hour – Click above to watch video after the jump

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World's Fastest Ferrari – Click above to watch video after the jump

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Click above for high-res gallery of various streamliners

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So, do you need a really big engine to go fast? Certainly not if you are metal fabricator John Buddenbaum or Eric Noyes, an engineer from NASA's Ames Research Center. This dynamic duo recently set out to go as fast as possible with as small an engine as possible, and we'd say they must have met whatever goals they may have had. New world records were set at the salt flats in Bonneville for the AMA Gasoline 50cc Motorcycle Streamliner Record at 194.24km/h and the AMA Fuel Record at 214.08km/h. Ju

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