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The battle over a proposed £25 Congestion Charge increase that would have been socked to big, dirty vehicles entering London is over. Porsche was the lead opponent of this fee increase, and announced the win on its Judicial Review website. I guess Porsche's huge PR campaign worked. Back when Ken Livingstone, who came up with the £25 congestion charge proposal, was still Mayor of London, the city announced that the majority was in favor of it. Porsche had other data.

In the ongoing fight between Porsche and Transport for London over the increased emissions charges in that city (previous stories - in chronological order - here, here, here, here and here), Porsche has now taken another step towards requesting judicial review of the charge. Following TfL's rejection of an earlier request from Porsche about changing the congestion charge, Porsche is giving the Mayor's office three weeks to respond to this latest filing.

Once the new London congestion charges were officially announced earlier this month, Porsche started a legal process against the Transport for London group (TfL is behind the c-charge). London officials responded to the threat and in response Porsche has put out a slew of numbers to defend their stance that the congestion charge won't reduce CO2 emissions in the slightest. You can read their argument for yourself after the jump or check out the company's new website dedicated to the fight.

Following Porshce's threat to start a legal process against the City of London for the city's upcoming increase in the congestion charge, a spokesperson for Ken Livingstone, the Mayor of London, has issued a response, calling Porsche's action a "double attack on Londoners." The two prongs are an attack on Londoners democratic rights and an attack on clean air in the city. The statement ends with, "No one is allowed to throw their rubbish in the street and Porsche should not be allowed to impose

The lightweight technology in Porsche's upcoming Panamera is being coveted by Volkswagen. Porsche Chief Designer Wolfgang Dürheimer told Automobilwoche that VW and Audi made it clear that they are interested in using the new materials for their own vehicles once Porsche became a significant VW shareholder. Since VW also has technologies that Porsche might want and the two have co-developed a hybrid transmission, working together on lightweight body panels, etc., is only natural, says Dü