4 Articles
Report

Americans love their dogs, but can our furry friends lead to distracted driving? A report in Consumer Reports says yes, as a study from AAA and Kurgo shows that 52 percent of dog owners pet their dog when they're in the car with them. Further, 19 percent use their hands to prevent the dog from hopping up to the front seat, and 18 percent reach into the back seat to pet their dog. These statistics, which come from a sampling of 1,000 dog owners, show that a pet can be every bit as distracting as

If you don't like dogs, there's now a new reason to continue avoiding canis domesticus. New Zealanders Robert and Brenda Vale have put forth the hypothesis that the care and feeding of a pooch is more environmentally harmful than rolling in a Toyota Land Cruiser. Those shifty, antisocial felines aren't much better, so don't get any more smug than you already are, cat people. One ten-pound feline's care is the same to the environment as a 3300-pound Volkswagen Golf, the theory goes.

If you don't like dogs, there's now a new reason to continue avoiding canis domesticus. New Zealanders Robert and Brenda Vale have put forth the hypothesis that the care and feeding of a pooch is more environmentally harmful than rolling in a Toyota Land Cruiser. Those shifty, antisocial felines aren't much better, so don't get any more smug than you already are, cat people. One ten-pound feline's care is the same to the environment as a 3300-pound Volkswagen Golf, the theory goes.

Click on the image for a gallery of high-res images of the Chevy Volt.