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London's Congestion Charging Scheme (CCS), which was implemented back in 2003 to reduce traffic volume in central London, has had virtually no impact on air quality, according to a study published by the Health Effects Institute (HEI). The study, "The Impact of the Congestion Charging Scheme on Air Quality in London," was led by professor Frank Kelly of King's College London as part of HEI's research into measures that could positively impact health by improving air quality.

London's Congestion Charge scheme may soon be coming to an end. Mayor Boris Johnson has already canceled the planned congestion zone expansion into western London and the residents of Manchester recently voted down a similar C-Charge plan by a huge margin. Now, Johnson is saying he has not ruled out a complete abandonment of the entire system. Back in 2003 when the C-Charge was first instituted, the goal of reducing traffic on London's busiest thoroughfares seemed noble enough, and the city coul

London Mayor Boris Johnson is considering scrapping the city's oft-maligned Congestion Charge. The pay-to-drive strategy was instituted back in 2003 as a way of reducing traffic in the busy British capital, but it has met with fierce opposition from motorists and some politicians. Shortly after taking office, Johnson got rid of the latest extension which instituted the C-Charge in western parts of the city, but the Congestion Charge Zone is still alive and well in Central London. While it may be

London Congestion Charge: FAIL. According to the most recent reports, traffic in London is exactly as bad today as it was before the C-Charge was ever initiated. London motorists have made their opinion about the system clear in recently voting out ex-Mayor Ken Livingstone, a man who championed the charges and had plans to increase their dollar amount and expand their coverage. The new mayor, Boris "Fast Lane" Johnson, says, "I have always thought that the Congestion Charge is a blunt instrument

Motorists in London had high hopes when they elected Boris Johnson as their mayor. The former Conservative party leader is a well-known gearhead, and even moonlights as an automotive journalist. And those hopes may just yet be vindicated, as Mayor Johnson begins rolling back the Congestion Charges instituted by his reviled predecessor "Red" Ken Livingstone.

The man who brought the congestion charge to London England has lost his bid for re-election as Mayor of England's capital. Ken Livingstone has always been a controversial figure in British politics but his tenure as mayor of London brought that controversy to new heights. In the course of his eight years at the helm, Livingstone introduced the congestion charge that requires drivers to pay a toll of £8 (about $16) per day to drive into a zone of central London. During the local elections

By now, you're surely aware of the efforts of London Mayor Ken Livingstone to increase London's congestion charge. You're also likely know about the distaste that Porsche feels regarding these changes. Back in late February, Porsche polled Londoners themselves and found that 74 percent of Londoners think that the new £25 congestion charge is too high. Hmm... Livingstone's got his own survey too, and he says, "This robust survey provides further clear evidence of the strong support from Lon

Toyota can't be the only one who benefits from the expansion of London's Congestion Charge zone next week, right? Honda is saying it expects there to be 6,500 more hybrid cars in London by 2008 (low-emission hybrids don't have to pay the £8 daily driving charge). In preparation, Honda will make available 3,000 petrol-electric Civic Hybrids in the UK during 2007.

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