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The Washington Post published a story this week about the one place Saudi women can get behind the wheel – an amusement park.

ETC

If You Could Opt Out Of Emissions-Reducing Hardware, Would You?

Governments now enforce emissions laws. What if you could choose to comply or not comply?

Indiana Gets Serious About Speed With Slowpoke Law

There's nothing more frustrating that being stuck behind a slow moving car in the passing lane, which is why Indiana is preparing lane hogs for when the new 'Slowpoke' law goes into effect July 1.

Report

The Fact Checker column in the Washington Post takes issue with a key report attacking dealer franchise laws. The paper, written at the Department of Justice in 2009, attempts to justify allowing manufacturers to sell directly to consumers, but because of some bad research, tried to make its case by citing a failed GM direct-sales program that had shut down years earlier.

Study

The American populace is getting older, and that means more senior citizens behind the wheel in the coming years. According to a study commissioned by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, people over the age of 65 already make up 17 percent of the driving population, and 68 percent of those over 85 are still on the road five or more days per week. However, new research indicates that older folks understand that there's a concern about their safety as drivers, and the study suggests they are wi

Protesters rallied against speed cameras sunday in one Long Island county

Automated traffic enforcement cameras are falling out of favor across America. A Long Island anti-camera group was the latest to protest Sunday.

Thirteen states, the District of Columbia and several US territories have hand-held cellphone bans

Recent studies have found banning cellphone use while behind the wheel is not leading to a decrease in accidents.

The state has left such laws up to municipalities

Montana became the only state in the nation that does not ban at least some drivers from texting when a new law took effect in South Carolina this week.

Why more laws don't always mean safer roads

On February 17, 2011, Monica Chavez was driving with her two children down North Grant St. in Thornton, Colo. when she passed out behind the wheel.

California's controversial "cool cars" guidelines have been laid to rest. According to a report from The Detroit News, the ill supported legislation is no more and automakers can rejoice. The pressure was too much for the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to handle any longer, and automakers, law enforcement officials and crime victim advocates are likely to celebrate their victory.

A man named Lonnie Ray Davis was pulled over by Michigan police. When they searched his car, they found an open alcohol container, crack, a wad of cash, a stun gun, and a .38 caliber handgun. He was, of course, arrested. But the reason they pulled him over has become a constitutional law issue: Davis had a Tweety Bird ornament dangling from his rear view mirror, and Michigan law forbids dangling things that "obstruct the vision of the driver of the vehicle."

My son asked what would happen if his finger were in the path of the electric window when it closed. I suggested we stick a piece of Red Vine licorice in the window to find out. The results weren't pretty, though to this day I'm still finding tiny bits of red licorice stuck in the channels of the window frame. Boys...

Based on recent moves in Indiana, Virginia, the PSA's in Australia, and now Massachusetts, speeding of the teen and adult varieties is the latest headline-grabbing menace to society. Massachusetts' Junior Operators' License Law, which outlines the punishments meted out to traffic offenders under the age of 18, was recently strengthened.

Quick. Which countries are the top three consumers of oil? If "Japan" was one of your answers, you'll be nearly unbeatable in trivia.