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Echo of 'dieselgate' comes after magazine reports on the latest problem.

Echo of 'dieselgate' comes after magazine reports on the latest problem.

Finn maintains a "lonely" lead virtually throughout the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix.

ABU DHABI — Valtteri Bottas won the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix on Sunday as Mercedes wrapped up another triumphant Formula One season with a one-two finish and four-times world champion Lewis Hamilton having to settle for second. The win was a career third for the Finn, who had started on pole position and stayed in front to deny Hamilton a 10th success of the 20-race campaign. "It's a really important win for me after having a pretty difficult start to the second half of the year," said Botta

Two races to go, and not letting up.

"There are two races to go. It is a better time than ever to apply even more pressure, just because you can,"

Motorsports

He'll use it as prep for a Triple Crown run at Le Mans.

He'll use it as prep for a triple-crown run at Le Mans

ETC

The U.S. is now the world's largest net fuel exporter

The U.S. is now the world's largest net fuel exporter.

It was going to be built in the Mexico plant that Ford had planned.

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"I'm 18 years old, the team knows that. It's a challenging year in Formula One, and I think the team looks at it as a bigger project than just the next race."

Motorsports

In a familiar refrain, Fernando Alonso was forced to retire with engine trouble.

"Unbelievable feeling," said Sato. "It was a tough, tough race, but Helio really drives fair so I can trust him. Fantastic race. Hopefully the crowd enjoyed it."

Cheaper welds, inferior materials, scant safety features all lead to higher profits

The cars roll endlessly off the local assembly lines of the industry's biggest automakers, more than 10,000 a day, into the eager hands of Brazil's new middle class. The shiny new Fords, Fiats, and Chevrolets tell the tale of an economy in full bloom that now boasts the fourth largest auto market in the world.

Report

According to the Los Angeles Times, new car sales in South America are skyrocketing, thanks to wage hikes, more jobs and easy credit terms. Last year, there were 3.5 million new car and light truck purchases in Brazil alone, representing an 86-percent increase over 2006.

Mexico hasn't accounted for nearly as much ink as the U.S. and Canada in recent discussions of the auto industry. But in case anyone was wondering, they're in a big hurt south of the border as well. While the American market's decline in auto sales factors in at about 25% overall, the Latin American Herald Tribune reports that Mexico has seen a 30.6% drop in sales volume.

Mexican President Felipe Calderon has announced a Cash-for-Clunkers program for buyers wishing to trade their cars in for something locally produced. So far, 500 million pesos ($37M USD) have been set aside for the program, but Calderone has reportedly said the subsidy could be doubled to one billion if the program proves successful.