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The so called Climate Bill, formally referred to as the American Power Act (read it in PDF), contains a wealth of information that could impact the environment, transportation, offshore drilling, clean coal and so much more. Senators John Kerry (D-MA) and Joseph Lieberman (I-CT) presented the bill yesterday with hopes of passing it by the end of the year. Reuters prepared a rundown of some emissions and transportation-related aspects contained in the bill:

Ever since the idea of carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) was first proposed, everyone from politicians to Big Oil lobbyists have spoken of the technology as already up and running successfully and ready for large scale implementation. Well, a new report in the Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering thinks that CCS' success is anything but a sure thing.

The U.S. media's political lens is focused pretty heavily on the health care debate right now, but that doesn't mean other items of interest aren't happening in Washington, D.C. For example, debate over the EPA's endangerment finding that found that greenhouse gases (GHGs), including those from on-road vehicles, threaten the public health and welfare of the American people is far from over.

Last spring, the EPA ruled that it could regulate CO2 and five other greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act because they are could be harmful to the health of humans. Automakers quickly responded by saying they hoped the finding wouldn't stop efforts to find a nationwide regulatory environment for emissions. In December, the EPA announced that, indeed:

To the surprise of many, the vast majority of the automakers that sell their wares here in the United States welcomed the EPA's decision earlier in the year that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are damaging to the environment and should therefore be regulated. That has plenty to do with the desire for a single national fuel mileage standard. But transportation certainly isn't the only way we generate greenhouse gases as a society.

It's official: the cars we drive are hurting us. The EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson announced today that "greenhouse gases (GHGs) threaten the public health and welfare of the American people. EPA also finds that GHG emissions from on-road vehicles contribute to that threat."

The saga of California's greenhouse gas waiver has come to an end with the EPA deciding that the state can indeed enforce its own GHG emissions standards for new motor vehicles. This means that, at least between now (with current model year vehicles) and when the 2012 MY vehicles arrive, California and the 13 states (and D.C.) that have adopted its rules will use the stricter emission standards to regulate vehicles. In the EPA's statement on the decision, it says it used "the law and science as

When I started posting here way back in 2006, one of the very first stories I wrote was about the state of California filing a lawsuit against six of the largest automakers over the damage caused by greenhouse gas emissions. The original premise was that the emissions from cars were a public nuisance that cost the state billions of dollars to deal with. Of course, the real root cause of the suit had to do with the state's struggles to regulate emissions of greenhouse gases. At the time, the stat

Southern California wildfires 2007

Now that the U.S. has officially concluded that greenhouse gasses are harmful to human health, it's time to do something about them. One major hurdle standing in the way of the U.S. implementing carbon cap and trade legislation appears to have been cleared as both the domestic automakers and Michigan's legislature have lifted their opposition and now support for the bill. Why? The Detroit News reports that an agreement has been reached that could see up to $15 billion paid out to the Detroit-bas

Now that the U.S. has officially concluded that greenhouse gasses are harmful to human health, it's time to do something about them. One major hurdle standing in the way of the U.S. implementing carbon cap and trade legislation appears to have been cleared as both the domestic automakers and Michigan's legislature have lifted their opposition and now support for the bill. Why? The Detroit News reports that an agreement has been reached that could see up to $15 billion paid out to the Detroit-bas

Finally. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has today ruled that six greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide, are harmful to the health of humans and will therefore be listed amongst the other pollutants that can be regulated by the Clean Air Act. According to the official report, greenhouse gases have, among other things, the following impacts:

According to the Detroit News, the Environmental Protection Agency has taken a likely step towards stricter emissions standards, as it has asked the White House Office of Management and Budget to declare greenhouse gas a public danger. California, along with several other states, is looking to enact tough new CO2 laws that will drastically limit the emissions of new cars and trucks. Automakers are against the idea, as they argue that the technology isn't currently available in large scale to mee

At the American Council on Renewable Energy's RETECH conference and expo last week, I was able to listen to a few presentations on renewables and transportation. It's always interesting to hear about the auto industry from people on the outside, and the RETECH presentations lived up to expectations. I'll be writing about a few of them this week.

In an announcement that should come as little surprise to anyone paying close attention, Lisa Jackson, President-elect Obama's newly-nominated EPA administrator, has said that she will immediately revisit the topic of whether individual states have the right to enact laws governing carbon emissions. Any laws made by individual states would have the effect of jacking up the national fuel economy requirements, which are themselves currently up in the air, since carbon dioxide is a natural byproduc

Way back in April of last year, or own Sam Abuelsamid suggested that the Bush Administration would surely leave any EPA regulations on greenhouse gas emissions to the next President, whomever that may be. It seems that he was right in that assessment, as the EPA is expected to announce later today that it will hold off on creating any specific emissions regulations for the time being. The EPA was told by the Supreme Court in 2007 that it had to either justify its inaction regarding greenhouse ga

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