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Featured
Yes, cops can pull you over for an obscured license plate

Got a bike rack or trailer hitch? One court says that's reasonable grounds for a traffic stop.

Most states have laws that require car owners to ensure their license plates remain visible and clear of obstructions. In practicality, that can be cumbersome. Trailers, trailer hitches, bike racks and other ordinary vehicle equipment can often restrict that view.

Featured
Refuse a breath test during DUI stop? It's now OK in Kansas

State court strikes down law that criminalized refusal, but US Supreme Court will likely decide issue.

A Kansas law that allowed authorities to charge motorists who refused breath or blood tests during drunk-driving investigations with additional crimes has been found unconstitutional.

Featured
Is Waze protected by the Constitution?

Police Concerns Over Popular App Complicate Motorists' Rights To Free Speech

Standing on a sidewalk, Doug Odolecki holds a hand-written cardboard sign in his hands that warns motorists of a DUI checkpoint that law-enforcement officers have set up about a half mile up State Road. It reads: "Checkpoint ahead! Turn now!

Pennsylvania Police Gain Broader Powers To Search Vehicles

Court ruling says police can search a car based on probable cause alone

Police officers in Pennsylvania no longer need a warrant to search your car during a traffic stop. A recent court ruling granted law-enforcement authorities broader powers in determining whether they can search a vehicle.

Official
ACLU releases license plate scanning docs, says you are being tracked

The proliferation of automated license plate readers in police departments around the country has increased dramatically over the years, leading the American Civil Liberties Union to commission a report to find out what they are being used for, the policies governing their use and how they should be used to benefit the American public. The report, which has just been released, is called You Are Being Tracked. The report's findings, according to the ACLU, show that plate readers are not being use

Report: Student finds GPS tracker stuck to car, FBI asks for it back

So, now that we know it is legal for the FBI to place GPS trackers on cars without a warrant, the next logical question is, how often does it happen? We can't say for sure, but the recent experience of 20-year-old U.S. student Yasir Afifi leads us to believe it's taking place more often that we'd like to think.