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The Fiat 500 is currently offered in Europe with two gasoline engines and just one diesel. Since the concept of "small sport diesel" exists in the European market, it doesn't come as a real surprise that Fiat seems to be working on a sportier version of the 1.3 Multijet diesel engine that's used in the 500. According to Cinquecentisti, the new powerplant has been announced for the convertible version, and will produce 95 hp and 200 Nm of torque. This engine would be fitted to a 5-speed manual bo

London Residential, an estate agency in Candem, London, has bought five Fiat 500 1.2 cars, as well as four electric scooters as transports for its agents. This isn't, of course, the first time the popular mini car has been used for advertising purposes thanks to its "iconic" status. London Residential claims it chose this model, with CO2 emissions at 119 g/km, as well as electric scooters in order to reduce the environmental impact of its agents when meeting potential customers and driving them

There has been quite a lot of speculation about a low-consumption Ferrari, or well, just one that uses less fuel (maybe not that little) but some prayers might have been answered by this: Because Fiat and Ferrari are linked, owners of Ferraris will have a special Fiat 500 as replacement vehicle when they take their cavallini rampanti to the dealers for maintenance. The Fiat 500 is the sportiest version available, the 1.4 liter with 100 HP, and before you comment let me be the one to say that the

When Fiat unveiled the revamped 500 almost a year ago, the company said it hoped the car would be considered the "iPod of cars." There's one aspect of the iPod, though, that Fiat is probably glad they aren't associated with: the products disposability. I mean, really, does Apple need to release a new version every other month?

You must think that the buyer was crazy, as the Fiat 500 can be bought in the dealer for about £10,000. Why would someone pay £200,000 for one? The car was sold at an auction last week for the benefit of the ARK (Absolute Return for Kids) charity. The auction raised a total of £25 million at a gala reception in the Royal Naval College, Greenwich, England and the car wasn't just any 500. This was one of four specially designed and painted versions created by English artist Trace

Although the Fiat 500 is made in Poland, Fiat is an Italian brand. What's something else that we associate with Italy? Pasta! Naturally, it was high time to put these two together. With headrests that look like ravioli and a gear stick that finishes in a giant "agniolotto," the Fiat 500 Giovanni Rana can't be more Italian (or weird). Don't miss that the car painted to look like freshly baked ciabatta and the pedals look like linguine.

The new Fiat 500 is proving to be quite popular in Europe where the crew from the Top Gear web site had a chance to try out the 1.3L diesel model. The cute little 500 draws plenty of attention on the streets of London, but it's what's under the skin that counts. The handling and steering are far superior to what one might expect from a little car like this. It corners flat and turns in smoothly. The 75hp 1.3L MultiJet diesel provides plenty of performance and still delivers 56 mpg (U.S.) on the

Fiat, maker of the cutesiest bit of neo-retro ever (the 500, pictured above) threw a party to mark the opening of their new flagship store in London's West End. The car company went all out with real celebrities (No, I wasn't there. Sigh.) and an art exhibition which featured, according to the press release, "the work of 22 young designers who are competing to design an accessory for the Fiat 500 that will be chosen to go into production..."

Even though the Fiat 500 is swimming in praise in Europe, the chance that this popular little car will make it to the U.S. is small and not getting any bigger. According to Just Auto, Fiat brand CEO Lorenzo Sistino "side-stepped" the question during a speech at the IESE Business School's Automotive Sector conference in Barcelona, Spain. Fiat doesn't have a dealer network in America but it will be reintroducing the Alfa Romeo here soon. Since the focus will be on Alfa Romeo, adding Fiat cars to t

Fifty-eight journalist from twenty-two countries around Europe have voted the Fiat 500 as "European Car of the Year 2008" with 385 votes, ahead of the Mazda 2 (325 votes) and the Ford Mondeo (202). The cute subcompact was also in 57 of the 58 short lists and was voted first by jury members.

Fiat has announced the pricing for the Fiat 500 in the UK, which will be on sale in January. Britons will be able to buy it for between £7,900 and £10,900 (that roughly translates to $15,500-21,900).

Fiat has just shown that you don't have to be huge to win a car body award. The company just won the Eurocarbody award, which is defined as "the annual Innovation Prize and the worldwide highest accolade of Automotive Circle International awarded for trailblazing engineering contributions to series developments in car body lightweight design and manufacturing," for the Fiat 500. The award was given during an event in Bad Nauheim/Frankfurt, Germany from 16 to 18 October, attended by 600 experts i

The original Fiat 500 from the 1950s was available in a Station Wagon version, the Giardinera, which we might consider to be the minivan's grandparent and placed the engine under the car floor. This is not the case for a possible version of the nuova 500, which is speculated in an article by Infomotori: the new 500 has its engine in the front.

The blokes who host that other British car show Fifth Gear got a chance to sample the new Fiat 500 a few months ahead of its UK launch next January. The new 500 competes in the same premium mini-car market as the MINI. Host Tom Ford describes the looks as chic rather than girly as some observers have. On the inside he found it quite roomy aside from rear seat head room. While the Mini has been around for a few years now he really like the freshness of the Fiat, in spite of it's throw-back looks.

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