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In mid-May, Epyon unveiled its fast-charging system for electric vehicles during the Nissan Leaf's brief stop in the city of Amsterdam. Later that month, the company installed Europe's first fast-charging station at a fueling depot in the Netherlands. Now, Epyon announced that it has lined up five investors willing to back the company to the tune of €7 million ($9.7 million U.S. at the current exchange rate). The funds will be used to scale up Epyon's operations, which includes installing f

Late last week, Epyon unveiled Europe's first commercial electric vehicle (EV) fast-charging station at a fueling depot in the Netherlands. The Epyon system is capable of delivering 50 kilowatts of juice, which the company claims can charge a nine-person taxi-van or a Nissan Leaf in as little as 30 minutes. Taxi Kijlstra, the nation's largest taxi company, recently converted a couple of its vans over to electric power and will utilize the charger during the work day.

More and more fast charging system will hit the streets over the next decade as electric vehicles become more common. As the market grows, more and more players will enter the space. One of them, Netherlands-based Epyon, showed off its new fast charger this week in Amsterdam along with a public display of the Nissan Leaf.

One of the hurdles in the way of the widespread adoption of electric vehicles is the ability to pull into a fuel station for a quick fill-up. A "multi-million" dollar injection from Chrysalix Energy Venture Capital could very well give Dutch company Epyon just what it needs to leap over that obstacle. The company claims their technology can charge lithium ion batteries in as little as five to fifteen minutes instead of the hours it typically takes now. How do they do it? By using "state-of-the-a