16 Articles
EDTA 2008: The View from Congress

It was very likely because of who the audience was, but all the panelists at today's "View from the Hill" seminar at the EDTA show agreed that electric drive is the way to go for the future of the American car. Congressional staffer JJ Brown, from Senator Orrin Hatch's (R-UT) office, Pat Bousliman, the natural resources adviser to the Senate Finance Committee, and Mike Carr, counsel to the Senate Energy & Natural Resources Com

NHTSA announces new CAFE standards through 2015

Last December, President Bush signed a new energy bill into law that requires automakers to achieve a Corporate Average Fuel Economy standard of 35 mpg by 2020. This historic stiffening of CAFE standards set a lofty goal, but left plenty of time to get there and new standards of any kind won't begin until the 2011 model year. Today, John Neff

'Splain Yourself: Senator invites EPA chief to California

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Stephen Johnson (shown above) has found himself with few friends after denying California's request for a waiver to regulate its own emissions. The denial was issued shortly after President Bush signed the new energy bill into law, leaving some to wonder if the auto industry struck a deal with the White House - we'll give you your energy bill if you give us one national emissions standard to follow, i.e. don't allow California to set its own set of s

President Bush signs energy bill into law

This morning President Bush put pen to paper (no doubt one of those really cool American President pens) and signed into law the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, all 822 pages of it. As we all know by now, the pillar of the law is an increase in Corporate

BREAKING: House passes energy bill (again), President will sign into law tomorrow

Once the Senate removed a big $21.8 billion tax package that Democrats had hoped would be included in our nation's new energy bill, the bill itself began John Neff

Energy Bill fails again in Senate by one vote, new vote set for later today

Earlier today, the U.S. Senate voted on the new Energy Bill that was recently passed by the House of Representatives before failing to get enough votes on the Senate floor its first time around. Today the bill again failed to pass in the Senate's hallowed hall by a single vote. The end tally wa

It's just a bill, that can't get passed: Senate fails to move energy bill forward

Despite being passed by the House of Representatives yesterday by a 235 to 181 margin, the new energy bill reached the Senate floor this morning and failed to muster enough votes to move on to the White House, where the President has threatened a veto of it in its current state. The Senate vote was 53 to 42, a majority but still seven votes shy of the 60 it needed. This means that the Senate will now spe

Energy bill vote delayed, CAFE back on the table

What did I tell ya? The great photo above is of Bush and Dingell from 2005 but it could have been two days ago. According to the Detroit News, the House has delayed the energy bill vote. As we reported, CAFE is largely settled and even Toyota has come out in support of the new agreement. Trouble is, John

White House threatens to veto energy bill again

Recently we reported that the CAFE issue was largely settled in the energy bill. On CSPAN Monday, Edmund Andrews of the New York Times even dared to say Dingell "lost." Do not underestimate the power of the Dingell side, you have no idea of the power he possesses. Don't believe me? Let's keep in mind that, according to Lascelles Linton

Bush tells Congress how to write an energy bill

Bush sent a letter telling Congress what changes they can make to the energy bill so he does not veto it. Allan Hubbard wrote the letter that the White House sent to Congressional leaders (Nancy Pelosi, Harry Reid, Mitch McConnell and John Boehner) with a list of "deal-makers and deal-breakers." The energy bill does not have enough votes to make the bill veto-proof, so Congress will probably read this letter very

Overview of Snake Oil Policy, or another look at energy bills pending in Congress

Need a rundown of the energy policy bills before Congress? At least one man's view?