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The Auto Alliance does not like feebates as a way to get cleaner vehicles on the road. Dave McCurdy, Alliance president & CEO, says a "feebate tax" [his words] is not the way to enact change. Why does the Alliance feel the need to speak out against feeble? Because the California Air Resources Board is considering adopting them and has tasked researchers at the University of California – Davis to report on the feasibility of such a program. The UC Davis team released an interim statemen

First reactions to the new CAFE standards announced yesterday are positive, with both the Union of Concerned Scientists and the Auto Alliance praising the new Clean Cars rules. UCS called the new 34.1 miles per gallon by 2016 number "a really big deal" that will allow Americans to "drive vehicles that save them money at the pump, cut the country's oil dependence, and produce a lot less global warming pollution." Alliance president and CEO Dave McCurdy, who has been fighting for years to get a n

Back in May, the Obama Administration raised the national CAFE standard to 35.5 mpg (for cars and trucks) by 2016. The higher standard would build from the 27.3 mpg 2011 standard and go up five percent each year until 2016. Today, the Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Transportation issued a joint statement proposing just how the two agencies will work together to reach the higher standard required for model year 2012-2016 vehicles.

I reported last month on Nissan's LEAF EV plans, as presented by Nissan Product Planning VP Larry Dominique at the August Center for Automotive Research Management Briefing Seminars (CAR MBS) in Traverse City, MI. Dominique's presentation was one highlight. Others included three speakers from Toyota and two each from Ford and GM that I wanted to share with AutoblogGreen readers. Can't cover everything, but here are interesting excerpts:

This year, Labor Day in the U.S. will be celebrated on September 7. That's over two weeks away, and not that long ago, the government had said the C.A.R.S. (Cash for Clunkers) program would be funded through that date. Looks like the rebate system is once again a victim of its own success once again: a new report says that C.A.R.S. will be shut down Monday. The news is all unsourced and unverified at this point, but [UPDATE: It's official] all indications are that the wind down is really happeni

Here's the thing: American automakers used to fully support E85-capable (aka flex-fuel) vehicles. With a few cheap additions to a standard engine ($100, or thereabouts), a car could get a special badge, drink corn (where available) and get the automaker a bit of goodwill, especially from politicians. The Auto Alliance often went out of its way to proclaim all of the flex-fuel vehicles its members were selling (see this PDF).

Today's EPA's decision to put CO2 on the list of greenhouse gases that endanger human health sets up a totally predictable confrontation with the Auto Alliance. The reason is that if CO2 can be regulated, then there is the potential for individual states (i.e., California) to enact their own greenhouse gas regulations. This, of course, could result in the Alliance's dreaded "patchwork" situation. So, it's no surprise that the Alliance would want to chime in on the decision, and we just got a sta

Auto Alliance President and CEO Dave McCurdy has released an Op-Ed titled "Embracing Change" in which he unsurprisingly uses can-do enthusiasm to explain just how well the big automakers are gearing up for the low-carbon economy and don't want a nasty patchwork of laws. McCurdy repeats the automakers' new rallying cry for "a smart and predictable regulatory environment." Translation: California had better not get to define its own greenhouse gas emissions regulations for half of the states.

Photo by Bien Stephenson. Licensed under Creative Commons license 2.0.

Following the big change that swept through American politics on Nov. 4, there has been a lot of celebration in a lot of places. Over at the Auto Allliance, the association made up of BMW Group, Chrysler LLC, Ford Motor Company, General Motors, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz USA, Mitsubishi Motors, Porsche, Toyota and Volkswagen, president and CEO Dave McCurdy was spending at least some time thinking about what sorts of opportunities and challenges the Obama Administration and a more De

Some are happy, some are sad with the decision yesterday by Judge Sessions in Vermont on the possibility of state fuel economy rules that would, in effect, supplant federal legislation.

Automakers are no longer in denial that they will have to improve the average fuel economy of their fleets. But they hope they can keep the decisions within the more comfortable confines of NHTSA instead of becoming a political volleyball for Congress.

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