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A Quick Primer On The Past, Present, And Future Of Car Hacking

Modern cars are nothing more than computers on wheels. As such, they're vulnerable to hackers.

New study says economic crunch is primarily to blame for decline in teen driving

Teens are driving less. That much, we know already. We've watched the auto industry gnash its collective teeth over the downward trend in Generation Y driving for the better part of a year.

As traffic fatalities increase, surveys show less and less people find drunk, aggressive and drowsy driving to be a threat

Americans are less likely to to see dangerous driving activities such as drunk, aggressive or drowsy driving as a threat to themselves or other drivers on the road, according to an analysis of four years of public surveys conducted by AAA.

Manuals say they should be inspected after 10 years, but does anyone ever do that?

Thirty pages deep in a beaten-up vehicle's owner's manual, there's a curious warning about aging airbags.

You'll be surprised to see what they can control from the back seat

About a month ago, we here at AOL Autos told you about the new department the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has set up to deal with the potential that hackers can get into your car's computer system and take it over.

More and more elderly drivers are behind the wheel, but screening for at-risk seniors still not occurring

The first comment left on George Russell Weller's online obituary reads: "Let us not forget the grief that he caused."

Author Carol-Ann Hamilton walks us through a very delicate conversation

Author Carol-Ann Hamilton walks us through a very difficult conversation: Telling your parents or an elderly relative that they need to stop driving.

Honking is banned, limited, and even protected across the country

When self-expression has been reduced to 140 characters, the stray honk of a car horn can seem like just another form of reflex communication. And just like Twitter, honking can be annoying, mindless, a nuisance, and even illegal while driving.

Follow these tips and keep children safe on the road

Did you know 3 out of every 4 car seats are used incorrectly? According to safercar.gov, parents haven't been doing enough to keep their kids safe on the road, which has resulted in vehicle crashes becoming one of the leading causes of death for children between 1 and 13 years old.

Cool new features could vastly improve safety on the road

YOKOSUKA, Japan -- Electronically managed steering that bypasses the mechanical link of a clutch is among the new safety technology from Japanese automaker Nissan.

Dozens of makes and models could be affected

WASHINGTON (AP) - Car owners whose air bags have been replaced in the past three years may have had dangerous counterfeit bags installed, the Obama administration warned Wednesday.

A gasoline-powered, big-block V8 housed in a tin shack fires up, the sound of its open exhaust echoing across the desert floor. Anyone passing by might mistake the sound for a local putting the finishing touches on a demolition derby racer, but what's about to happen is a totally different kind of crash.

Today's autos are chock-full of safety equipment that vastly improves your chances of survival in the event of a crash. And if an automaker wants to achieve the best crash test scores, it has to ensure that parts like bumper beams, air bag sensors and radiator supports perform properly during a collision. But while automakers are concerned about their safety record, in some cases, aftermarket parts makers are more concerned with keeping costs down.

When word first came down that Congress was looking to mandate that all new vehicles to be sold with Event Data Recorders, we knew that the added tech was going to be pricey. According to Automotive News, if legislators have their way, the new automotive black boxes will need to be both fire resistant and waterproof. Add in a significant amount of recording time before and after an accident, and suddenly the price tag per unit could soar up to a lofty $4,000 to $5,000. Currently, the EDRs track

Safety doesn't sell cars. At least that's what Detroit executives walked around saying back in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. The whole of them were convinced that if you even mentioned the word "safety" in a marketing campaign it would imply that cars were unsafe. In fact, it took a crusader like Ralph Nader to stand up to the auto industry and say enough with the death traps, like he did when he published his infamous Unsafe at Any Speed (only one chapter is about the Corvair!) in 1965. Like him

There aren't a lot of positives about being overweight, but a study by the University of Michigan shows that there could be one reason for the chunky among us to celebrate. U of M studied 300,000 traffic fatalities obtained from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration between 1998 and 2008, and it has reportedly found that overweight people had a 22 percent lower fatality rate than underweight people. However, the story changes for the worse if you're a man with a Body Mass Index (BMI

Is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration about to add some more safety measures to your next new car? According to The Detroit News, they might be. The Motown daily says that government officials are pondering whether or not they should require new vehicles to be fitted with lane-departure warning systems and automatic braking systems that trigger upon warning of an impending accident. Both systems are currently available only in very small percentage of new passenger cars – p

Immense amounts of money, research, effort, time, and science have gone into making cars safer. Your economy car is so safe now that you'll survive an accident with a larger vehicle. But it's also so safe now that the traditional blades, jaws, and saws that fire departments would use to extricate you are no longer strong enough to get through the car's metal.