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2011 Chevrolet Volt – Click above for high-res image gallery

A year ago, the White House led the effort to get automakers' Corporate Average Fuel Economy to 35.5 miles per gallon by 2016. Although the number was eventually pegged at 34.1 mpg, it will actually be slightly lower because of other non-automotive credits that will be applied. One might have thought automakers would still be grousing the work that needs to be done, but in fact they encouraged the federal government to go further, and so it has: the White House began working this week on setting

A year ago, the White House led the effort to get automakers' Corporate Average Fuel Economy to 35.5 miles per gallon by 2016. Although the number was eventually pegged at 34.1 mpg, it will actually be slightly lower because of other non-automotive credits that will be applied. One might have thought automakers would still be grousing the work that needs to be done, but in fact they encouraged the federal government to go further, and so it has: the White House began working this week on setting

With strict CAFE standards set at 34.1 miles per gallon by 2016, automakers have a long, tough road ahead of them. If you compare recent fuel economy increases over the past five years, the task that lies ahead is downright daunting.

It's not all that often that you hear automakers cry out for stronger regulations and stricter guidelines. In fact, the cries typically go the other way, begging for less oversight and looser laws. So, when automakers band together suggesting changes to CAFE guidelines beyond 2016 that would take fuel economy figures to new heights, we should probably listen, right?

As experts from the automotive industry and government discuss how to determine efficiency ratings for electric vehicles (EVs), they have quickly come to a conclusion that nobody will be happy to hear: it can't be done.

2010 Audi S4 – Click above for high-res image gallery

Think City – Click above for high-res image gallery

News of new CAFE regulations that would push mileage requirements up significantly came just days ago. The numbers are set and automakers will have to aim high, sort of, to hit the target of 35 miles per gallon by 2016. Several reports have stated that meeting these goals will add an average of $985 to the price of a new car by 2016. Estimates have also come in showing that automakers will spend a staggering $51.5 billion over the next five years to meet the new requirements. So, what's the real

Nissan Leaf EV – Click above for high-res image gallery

The cosmic oil-consumption scales have been tipping back and forth a lot this week. On Tuesday, Nissan revealed that its all-electric Leaf will be priced lower than most of us expected. On Wednesday, President Obama announced that we'll be ramping up our off-shore drilling efforts on the East Coast. And on Thursday, the EPA and NHTSA announced changes to the nation's CAFE standards, upping them to more than 34 miles per gallon by 2016 and regulating green house gasses for the first time. So, in

First reactions to the new CAFE standards announced yesterday are positive, with both the Union of Concerned Scientists and the Auto Alliance praising the new Clean Cars rules. UCS called the new 34.1 miles per gallon by 2016 number "a really big deal" that will allow Americans to "drive vehicles that save them money at the pump, cut the country's oil dependence, and produce a lot less global warming pollution." Alliance president and CEO Dave McCurdy, who has been fighting for years to get a n

We knew it was coming. Today, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency jointly released new Federal CAFE fuel mileage and greenhouse gas emissions requirements that will cover the 2012 through 2016 model years. The estimated fleet-wide fuel economy standard has been set at 34.1 miles per gallon by 2016, though improvements in air conditioning systems will bring that number up to around 35 mpg. That equals a standard of roughly 250 grams of carbon

2011 Porsche 911 Turbo S – Click above for high-res image gallery

2010 Volkswagen Golf - Click above for high-res image gallery

2010 Volkswagen Golf - Click above for high-res image gallery

The 2010 Detroit Auto Show kicked off this morning with a positive little speech by United States Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood. Speaking about the coming electrification of the automobile, he said that "this is what the American people want." When asked how much money the government would pay over the next decade for a plug-in vehicle infrastructure, all he would say is that the costs would be shared between industry and government.

The 2010 Detroit Auto Show kicked off this morning with a positive little speech by United States Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood. Speaking about the coming electrification of the automobile, he said that "this is what the American people want." When asked how much money the government would pay over the next decade for a plug-in vehicle infrastructure, all he would say is that the costs would be shared between industry and government.

America's CAFE standards will climb to 35.5 mpg (42 mpg for cars, 26 mpg for light trucks) by 2016, thanks to the Obama Administration declaring not long after taking power how conflicting national and state (well, California) standards would be turned into one set or rules. But what comes after 2016? The Consumer Federation of America (CFA) says that 45 mpg is the new black and is pushing Obama to look long-term. CFA also believes that the technology to reach a 45 mpg average is available and

2010 Honda Insight - Click above for high-res image gallery

It was big news when the Obama Administration updated CAFE requirements in May to a new and higher national MPG standard of 42 mpg for cars (26 mpg for light trucks) by 2016. The higher standards will start increasing with 2011 model year vehicles. But what is CAFE? And how do these new numbers – before the raise, cars needed to average 27.5 mpg and trucks 24 mpg – change what will be available in dealerships in the coming decade?

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