6 Articles
Meeting new CAFE regs will cost Detroit double what it costs the Japanese

The average cost for Detroit's Big Three automakers to meet the proposed fuel efficiency targets of 31.6 miles per gallon by 2015 has been pegged at $30.6 billion. In contrast, the average cost for the Japanese automakers sits at less than half that amount at "only" $14.85 billion. These numbers come courtesy of a recent study by Global Insight. In a real shocker, General Motors alone is expected to pa

Dingell might get the final say on state-based fuel economy laws

We all know that the Democratic Representative from the Automakers Michigan, John Dingell, is a foe of state-based regulations over the auto industry. Back in February, he tried to revive an excised portion of the energy bill that would have made federal CO2 limits take precedence over state rules. In an editorial in Sebastian Blanco

NADA Chairwoman says flexibile CAFE standards are the right move

At the National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) meeting last weekend, GM CEO Rick Wagoner asked car dealers to lobby their state and local governments to not regulate tailpipe emissions. The NADA is going to take the legislative battle over CAFE fuel requirements seriously, something that NADA chairwoman Annette Sykora Sebastian Blanco

Perverse side effects of the new CAFE standards?

Automotive News (subs req'd) has published a very interesting article on how the new CAFE rules might bring some surprises for American car buyers.

It's official: Congress passes 35 mpg CAFE standard

This afternoon, the energy bill that requires 35 mpg by 2020 CAFE handily passed Congress. After passing in the Senate last week, the first increase in average fleet fuel economy in 32 years sailed through the House of Representatives 314-100. The auto industry's best friend in Congress, Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich., "was key to a compromise on vehicle efficiency increases," as the AP