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China is the world's largest auto market.

Athens, Madrid mayors also join the effort to reduce emissions via car mandate.

Mayors at C40 Summit in Mexico City look to do their part to reduce the number of annual deaths from transportation pollution.

Norway's leaders want to "encourage more environmentally friendly vehicles by using the carrot instead of stick."

A spokesman for Norway's Ministry of Transport has denied that the country is planning on banning gas and diesel vehicles by 2025, saying new technology would do the job (in the long term) rather than regulations.

Older gas-powered vehicles would be legal thanks to a 'grandfather' clause.

And you thought it was old news by now.

It's happening.

Paris has officially banned cars built before 1997 from entering the city during the daytime on weekdays, and could soon expand even further until only EVs are left within the city limits.

The Washington Post published a story this week about the one place Saudi women can get behind the wheel – an amusement park.

Smokers who light up in vehicles with children inside will face fines in England and Wales due to a new ban that went into effect Thursday.

Paris banned vehicles with even-numbered license plates yesterday to reduce record smog levels.

After A Temporary Stop Last Fall, Things Don't Go UberPop's Way One More Time

A German court banned Uber and UberPop from offering ridesharing services anywhere in the country, adding to the company's troubles in Europe.

The mayor of Paris is supporting a possible ban on cars registered before 1997 from entering the city center. By 2020, that prohibition could roll forward to include vehicles from before 2011.

The ridesharing service Uber promises to connect people needing a lift with drivers offering one, and it appears to be pretty useful. After all, you can use it to summon Optimus Prime. For many cab drivers around the world, though, the app is basically the bane of their existence. The French passed a law mandating wait times before pickups in January, and 30,000 European cabbies staged a mass protest in June. The latest group hoping to ban Uber is the government of Seoul, South Korea.

If it can go in your gas tank, it's potentially controversial up in Maine. A few years ago, out-of-spec gas pumps were a problem. Today, the issue is the corn-based biofuel ethanol, which the state legislature is taking a strong stand against. Citing potential engine and environmental damages, Maine's state legislature has taken another step to potential rid itself of ethanol blends into its gasoline inventory.

Maine is located in the upper northeast corner of the continental US, but the state is thinking throw itself smack-dab in the middle of the controversy involving sales of gasoline blends with higher percentages of corn-based ethanol. The Pine Tree State's Department of Environmental Protection is mulling over writing a bill that would ban public sales of gasoline with more than 10 percent ethanol, the Bangor Daily News says.

Concerned that "gadgets and bells and whistles" are distracting drivers, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood is reportedly pushing to keep the technologies out of driver's hands – without going so far as to say he'll try to restrict them. LaHood, who has already campaigned for a ban on hand-held texting and cell phone use while operating a moving vehicle, says he is "going to talk to the car manufacturers and see where this leads."

According to a report by Reuters, the Chinese government has suspended the importation of Hyundai and Kia products from South Korea. The importation ban allegedly stems from complaints filed by dealers that the automaker violated anti-trust laws in China by throwing more support behind its own dealers and thus limiting the support offered to independent retailers.

The City Council of Madrid, Spain, has unveiled plans to create a low-emissions zone in the city center which would ban polluting cars. This system is very similar to the ones implemented in several German cities and differs from Milan and London's option of an urban toll (or congestion charge).

China will ban about half of its 3.3 million cars from the streets during the Beijing Olympics (August 8-24) in an attempt to cut air pollution. Necessary cars like emergency vehicles, buses and taxis will be allowed but only if they have an even or odd number license plate number that matches the even or oddness of the date. China may also change the emissions standards of cars and gasoline sold in Beijing to comply with international standards. Will all of this lower the air pollution at the B

It was come to my attention recently that the president of Mexico, Felipe de Jesús Calderón Hinojosa, is an avid AutoblogGreen reader. Just the other day we mentioned that gas-guzzling, pollution-spewing, used American cars were flooding the streets of Mexico, creating the conditions for impending environmental disaster. Well, the good president obviously read the post and quickly made an astute decision. Ban this horde of iron invaders! One bold decision and everybody's happy, no?

We told you there are concerns Tata Motor's Nano will drive up oil prices. What does Tata chairman Ratan Tata think about this? In the first video below the fold, Ratan laughs it off. We told you Sir Mark Moody-Stuart, former Shell chairman said low MPG cars should be banned. Want to see Mark say that in his Prius? Check out the second video below the fold. We told Mitt Romney said he supported the Governator's right to get a waiver ... then Mitt took it back. Want to see Mitt's first position o

If you're of the opinion that the religious right has too much influence on American politics, you should check out Saudi Arabia. The royal family has relied for decades on the support of fundamentalist Wahabi clerics who, in return for their support to the ibn Saud regime, have insisted on ever more stringent laws. Among those measures has been a strict ban prohibiting women from driving that has been in effect for 75 years since the founding of Saudi Arabia in 1932, but the Saudi government is

At a meeting called by the FIA in Paris, the principals of each team agreed that a ten year ban was too long, but begun discussions on how costs could be curbed in the sport. Rather than continue imposing half-measures aimed at reducing costs, most of the teams agreed that the FIA should actually reduce costs by instituting an overall budget cap, as many had suggested... Autoblog included. Although Ferrari remains opposed to a budget cap, its former technical chief and now head honcho at Honda,

Autocar is reporting that the European Parliament will consider a proposal this fall to ban all cars capable of reaching speeds over 101 mph. The proposal can be traced back to a man named Chris Davies, a Liberal Democrat Member of the European Parlaiment for the North West of England. Davies argues (try not to laugh while reading his words) that "between 1994 and 2004 the power of new cars went up by 28 per cent, making them a lot heavier, and so increasing the amount of CO2 they put out, even

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