8 Articles
1 / 1

The National Platfrom for Electric Mobility was officially launched in Berlin, Germany on Monday and the Volkswagen Group showed off its upcoming array of hybrid and plug-in vehicles for chancellor Angela Merkel. The platform is a public-private alliance to promote the use of electrified vehicles.

With pressure mounting on Iran to halt its nuclear program, Daimler is reportedly joining the growing list of businesses – German ones especially – that are reducing their commercial activities with the rogue nation.

Before the Frankfurt Motor Show brought us the latest models and concepts from automakers, it was opened by German Chancelor Angela Merkel. The inauguration speech by the Chancellor included describing her country's support for electric vehicles: Germany expects that there will be up to seven million EVs, including plug-ins, and about 18 million hybrid cars in 2020. These figures would account for a third of the expected cars on German roads at that time. Merkel's speech divided the expansion of

MINI E - click above for high-res image gallery

With General Motors expected to file for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in New York on Monday morning, negotiators in Germany scrambled to finalize a deal to save Opel from insolvency. Following a six-hour meeting in the German Chancellor's office in Berlin on Friday evening, a deal was finally announced by finance minister Peer Steinbrueck. Although an overall deal to transfer control of Opel from General Motors was reached, details are still being worked out and a final contract won't be sig

Calls to impose speed limits on the famous autobahn have been heard before. But the pressure was stepped up a notch when EU Environment Commissioner Stavros Dimas called for the Germans to give up their wide-open speed policy. As expected, the German auto industry and some officials resented the demand, saying they're taking care of emissions reductions and fighting global warming on their own.

In a move some would say is similar the the U.S. automakers stance on revised CAFE standards for light trucks and passenger cars, the major German automakers are in opposition to a requirement to lower emissions standards by producing smaller cars with smaller engines. Just as Lutz was quoted on his blog as stating that "Forcing us to alter the fleets to hit some theoretical average won't change what consumers want, or what they'll buy", German automakers claim that "the German industry, which m

1 / 1
Share This Post

Angelamerkel Questions

There are no questions about this topic.
Be the first to ask!

From Our Partners