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Technologies are always advancing forward, especially in your vehicle. As more safety technologies are being introduced into the market, it can be hard to keep track of everything. So here are 8 technologies designed to keep you safe on the road. Want more coverage? Head over to http://bit.ly/2CcOngW

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Behind-the-bag look at the energy one of these unleashes

Airbags pack a lot of punch.

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Feinberg previously oversaw the Sept. 11 attacks compensation fund, the BP oil spill fund and compensation paid by General Motors Co. to victims of its faulty ignition switches.

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Do loud pipes save lives? We don't know ... but they can definitely pop airbags.

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Autoliv, a rival airbag supplier, reported concerns over Takata's airbag inflator design.

One Autoliv engineer said a Takata airbag inflator "turned into shrapnel" when tested.

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Hawaii became the first state to sue Takata, claiming "unfair and deceptive conduct."

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The airbag safety crisis that has engulfed the auto industry – the one behind more than two dozens recalls from 11 different manufacturers affecting roughly 25 million vehicles over the past eight years – just got worse.

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Honda, Toyota, and Mazda have all opted to drop airbag inflator supplier Takata, while other Japanese stalwarts consider a similar move.

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DOT Officials Take Unprecedented Actions To Speed Repairs

As investigators searched for clues about why certain airbags showered motorists with deadly amounts of metal fragments, the company that made the defective devices thwarted their queries.

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NHTSA has opened an investigation into the airbag inflators of a second supplier, amid concerns that age may be playing a part in reports of bad inflators.

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Congress Grills Takata And Federal Officials On Airbag Crisis

Federal officials and an executive from automotive supplier Takata took turns Tuesday explaining to Congress why it took years before any of them took action to protect motorists from a deadly airbag defect and why safety problems still threaten drivers.

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DOT Secretary Says Supplier Is 'Bad Actor' On Safety Landscape

Federal investigators said Friday that global automotive supplier Takata has not cooperated with a problem into the company's exploding airbags, which are responsible for killing at least five motorists and injuring dozens more.

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Transportation Secretary: Airbag Supplier's Conduct Is 'Unacceptable'

Global automotive supplier Takata has not cooperated with an investigation into exploding airbags responsible for killing at least five motorists and injuring dozens more, federal authorities said Friday.

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It seems Takata has manufacturing issues beyond the technical details of its airbags. The Japanese company is not in the good graces of American authorities after declining a national recall in response to faulty airbag deployments, while authorities in Mexico are unhappy with health and safety issues at Takata's plant in Monclava, Mexico, where millions of inflators are being produced to service automaker recalls.

Issue arises from ongoing Takata airbag recalls

Honda recently started disclosing possible recalls related to airbag malfunctions in certain vehicles. The automaker is asking customers buying those used cars to sign a document that acknowledges they've been made aware of the issue. Buyers may be better informed, but such a signature could also shift liability away from the automaker.

Moisture is only latest in long line of explanations for Takata's problem

The latest details of a troubling safety trend arrived Monday, when seven automakers issued eight recalls for cars that may contain airbags that could kill drivers instead of saving their lives.

Leading safety advocates call for independent investigation of NHTSA

Federal safety investigators put General Motors under a microscope earlier this week, asking the troubled automaker 107 detailed questions about its decade-long delay in recalling cars with a deadly defect. Now, it may be the federal government's turn to face questions.