• Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

We try to keep it classy ... mostly

One of the best things about the release of a new, ultra-expensive automobile such as the 2019 Rolls-Royce Cullinan is that there is inevitably a new car configuration tool for us to play with. And these are usually the most fun to use, since there are simply so many possible combinations from the classy to the garish (such as the above creation we've dubbed "Auric"). So click on to see what we at Autoblog would create given loads of money, and if you want to make your own, click here to go the Rolls-Royce configuration tool.

We must warn you, though, there's A LOT to customize. Time may fly by. 

  • Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

Associate Editor Joel Stocksdale

One of my favorite colors is blue, so I decided I would theme my Cullinan around that hue. Metropolitan Blue is the specific shade, which I felt was a nice mix of subtlety, but while still clearly having color. I brightened things up with silver coach lines, partially polished wheels, and the silver hood I fell in love with when it showed up on the old Phantom Drophead Coupe.
  • Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

Associate Editor Joel Stocksdale

Inside, the blue and silver/gray theme continues. Most of the leather is finished in Navy Blue, and it's accented by dark gray stitching and piping. I couldn't find a gray wood trim, so I stuck with the black open pore trim. And because I like open-pore wood, I put it everywhere I could: along the dash, in the center stack, and on the steering wheel, which is also finished in Navy Blue leather.

As for features, I added the massage function to the front, since I've discovered it's quite nice on long drives. And naturally I had to upgrade the stereo, also for those long, and sometimes short drives. I couldn't resist the deep lamb's wool carpeting either. But in the back, I skipped the "Recreation Module" and the fancy seats because I actually want to be able to use this as an SUV sometimes. Meaning I need to be able to drop the seats to stuff all my stuff into it.

  • Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

Consumer Editor Jeremy Korzeniewski

I went with a dark overall theme for my mythical Rolls-Royce Cullinan. I chose a simple black paint color, added the stainless trim, and went with the flashy silver hood. An uplit Spirit of Ecstasy emblem is another nice talking point.
  • Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

Consumer Editor Jeremy Korzeniewski

I'm not entirely sure that I'd choose this color scheme for the interior of my own personal Cullinan – which I'll never actually have, of course – but it's fun to play with options. I combined Navy Blue and Ardent Red, then added Open Pore Paldao wood and extended it to cover the center stack mostly because it looks cool with its interesting chevron pattern of grain.
  • Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

Contributing Editor James Riswick

As much as my uber-rich hypothetical self would happily create something loud and colorful for different cars, I would never besmirch the good, classy name of Rolls-Royce in such a way. This Midnight Sapphire is a classy way to go and pairs nicely with what I have cooking inside. Regular Spirit of Ecstasy, no alloy hood and pretty straight-forward 22-inch polished wheels. 
  • Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

Contributing Editor James Riswick

I've gone for a nautical-inspired theme inside with a Navy Blue primary color, Seashell secondary color and Open Pore Royal Teak veneer. I couldn't figure out if you can change that big band of black across the dash face, but oh well. I seriously love this color combo. Rolls-Royce ahoy!
  • Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

Senior Editor Alex Kierstein

Sense a theme here? Seems we like the dark blue as the exterior color, and lots of us chose the contrasting hood - er, sorry, bonnet. It's about as tasteful as I can make the exterior of this beast. Body color wheel center caps are a subtle touch.
  • Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

Senior Editor Alex Kierstein

In a Rolls like this, my preference would be to have every surface covered with leather or carpet. I think that open-pore wood could look dangerously dated as tastes change. Leather also smells good, and Rolls uses some of the best hides out there. The more leather, the better. Dark lambswool mats help protect the sand-colored carpets, and a nice saddle tan covers the seats.
  • Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

Managing Editor Greg Rasa

I normally think silver cars are BORING, but I reverse-engineered the color scheme based on the silver hood option, and you have to figure Rolls has a gorgeous silver. (By the way, does one's chauffeur have to wear welder's goggles to see past the sun's reflection off a polished silver hood?)
  • Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

Managing Editor Greg Rasa

I kept the interior simple, basic black. Those floor mats appear greenish-gray in this rendering, and the configurator was having problems correcting them. When the car arrives, I must insist the dealership rip them out, as they simply won't do.
  • Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

Associate Editor Reese Counts

No one else is doing this right. I want it loud and ostentatious. I want everyone to know I have a bunch of money and am willing to spend it on stupid stuff like a bright purple Rolls-Royce. You drive a Cullinan because you want to be seen. Well there's no ignoring this. I went for the gold Spirit of Ecstasy. I would have gone for matching gold trim if it was an option. 

  • Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

Associate Editor Reese Counts

Of course, it had to match. I want a herd's worth of leather and a flock's worth of wool in here. I want it to smell like money and vulgarity. I want everyone to look and stare and form terrible opinions about the dude in the purple tank. This is perfection. Fight me. 
  • Image Credit: Rolls-Royce

On the other hand ...

You could get a proper Rolls-Royce instead. None of this SUV business. 
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