2021 GMC Yukon Reviews

2021 Yukon New Car Test Drive

The following review is for a 2020 Model Year. There may be minor changes to current model you are looking at.

Introduction

Though the familiar design is now entering its seventh year, the full-size 2020 GMC Yukon SUV is still as spacious, capable, and elegant as ever. 

The 2020 Yukon is available in both standard and long-wheelbase variations. The long-wheelbase model, known as the Yukon XL, rides on a 14-inch longer wheelbase than the standard-length model. Overall length is up 20.5 inches. The stretch yields significantly more cargo space and third-row legroom. 

As an old-school SUV, the Yukon gets old-school V-8 power. Most models come standard with a 5.3-liter V-8 that makes 355 horsepower and 383 pound-feet of torque, but a 6.2-liter V-8 is also available. This engine puts out a full 420 hp and 460 lb-ft of torque. 

The smaller engine continues to use a 6-speed automatic, but the 6.2-liter sends its power through a 10-speed automatic. Rear-wheel drive is standard across the range, though four-wheel drive is available. Properly equipped, this SUV can tow a full 8,500 pounds. 

Expect 15 mpg city, 22 mpg highway, 18 mpg combined for a rear-drive Yukon with the 5.3-liter V-8. Four-wheel drive drops that to 15/21/17 mpg. The 6.2-liter engine improves highway gas mileage over the base powertrain, almost certainly due to the more efficient 10-speed automatic and its higher final-drive ratios. This engine is good for 15/23/17 mpg in RWD spec and 14/22/17 in 4WD trim. 

Fuel economy for the longer Yukon XL models are nearly identical to the standard-length models. 

The NHTSA gives the Yukon a four-star overall rating.Some trims offer adaptive cruise control and automatic emergency braking. 

Lineup

All prices include an $1,295 destination charge. All prices are for rear-wheel-drive models; four-wheel drive is a $3,000 upgrade for every trim level. 

The SLE ($51,895; $54,795 for XL) is the cheapest Yukon, outfitted with cloth upholstery, tri-zone climate control, an 8.0-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and 18-inch wheels. It's the only Yukon available with a front bench seat, which costs $250. 

The SLT Standard Edition ($56,095; $58,995 for XL) comes with leather seats, a power liftgate, and some active safety features including blind-spot monitors, rear cross-traffic alert, and lane-keep assist. 

The SLT ($59,095; $61,995 for XL) adds heated and cooled front seats, heated second-row seats, a heated steering wheel, keyless start, and power-folding seats for the second and third rows. 

The Denali ($68,995; $71,895 for XL) is the top-spec Yukon. It gets the 6.2-liter V-8, the chrome-mesh Denali grille, 22-inch wheels, Bose audio, magnetic suspension, and navigation. 

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