2021 Cadillac CT5

2021 CT5 Photos
 Editors' Pick
Autoblog Rating
6.5

The Cadillac CT5 is a solid entry into the the entry-level premium sedan segment, but it doesn't do anything to separate itself from its rivals. Its solid chassis is its best attribute, but it's held back by a below-average interior.

Industry
N/A
The Cadillac CT5, which was brand new for the 2020 model year, took the place of the CTS in General Motors’ luxury sedan portfolio. Its mission is the same as the car it replaced: compete on equal footing with the German trio of Audi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz along with Japanese brands Acura, Infiniti and Lexus. But it does so with a radically different package than the CTS. In place of the sharp corners and angular greenhouse of its predecessor is a smoother sedan with a flowing fastback shape. The new CT5 is also around $10,000 cheaper than the CTS it replaces, despite the fact that the two are within a few inches in exterior dimensions. So while it may be sized similarly to the cars it used to compete with, including the BMW 5 Series and Mercedes E-Class, it's now priced like a 3 Series or C-Class.  Clearly, Cadillac thinks this refined strategy will position the CT5 to better compete against those established luxury players. The car itself drives quite well and is stylish, well equipped, and that price-to-size ratio gives it a unique proposition to attract buyers away from the Europeans. What's new for 2021? The CT5 finally gets Cadillac’s Super Cruise semi-autonomous technology for 2021. It's the latest version that includes Lane Change on Demand functionality, but it’s only available on Premium Luxury and V-Series trim levels. Caddy’s sport sedan also gets a 12-inch digital gauge cluster with multiple themes, including a Track theme on the high-performance CT5-V. A new Diamond Sky special edition package will be offered on Premium Luxury CT4 and CT5 models, adding interior and exterior styling upgrades along with all-season run-flat tires on unique wheels. Additional updates include wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and a console-mounted rotary infotainment knob that enables left and right clicks to more easily navigate the infotainment system.   What's the CT5’s interior and in-car technology like? The Cadillac CT5 interior can best be described as “nice enough.” Unfortunately, "nice enough" isn’t quite good enough to compare favorably with Audi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz or Volvo. We'd say it's not good enough to compare with cross-town rival Lincoln, either, but they won't be selling sedans in 2021. The overall design of the CT5's interior is reasonably good, if evocative of previous-generation BMWs, but it's let down by some noticeable cheap-feeling bits and pieces that feel like they came from one of GM's non-premium divisions ... because they literally came from one of GM's non-premium divisions. By contrast, you won't find Camry switchgear in a Lexus.  Cadillac has a brand-new infotainment system that will be launching in the new Escalade SUV, but the CT5 sticks with the brand’s oft-maligned touchscreen interface (previously known as CUE). As much as customers and journalists have complained about it over the years, the latest (and likely last) version found in the CT5 works pretty well. All the necessary functions are easy to find, and the touchscreen is quick and responsive. And if you really don’t like the …
Full Review
The Cadillac CT5, which was brand new for the 2020 model year, took the place of the CTS in General Motors’ luxury sedan portfolio. Its mission is the same as the car it replaced: compete on equal footing with the German trio of Audi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz along with Japanese brands Acura, Infiniti and Lexus. But it does so with a radically different package than the CTS. In place of the sharp corners and angular greenhouse of its predecessor is a smoother sedan with a flowing fastback shape. The new CT5 is also around $10,000 cheaper than the CTS it replaces, despite the fact that the two are within a few inches in exterior dimensions. So while it may be sized similarly to the cars it used to compete with, including the BMW 5 Series and Mercedes E-Class, it's now priced like a 3 Series or C-Class.  Clearly, Cadillac thinks this refined strategy will position the CT5 to better compete against those established luxury players. The car itself drives quite well and is stylish, well equipped, and that price-to-size ratio gives it a unique proposition to attract buyers away from the Europeans. What's new for 2021? The CT5 finally gets Cadillac’s Super Cruise semi-autonomous technology for 2021. It's the latest version that includes Lane Change on Demand functionality, but it’s only available on Premium Luxury and V-Series trim levels. Caddy’s sport sedan also gets a 12-inch digital gauge cluster with multiple themes, including a Track theme on the high-performance CT5-V. A new Diamond Sky special edition package will be offered on Premium Luxury CT4 and CT5 models, adding interior and exterior styling upgrades along with all-season run-flat tires on unique wheels. Additional updates include wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and a console-mounted rotary infotainment knob that enables left and right clicks to more easily navigate the infotainment system.   What's the CT5’s interior and in-car technology like? The Cadillac CT5 interior can best be described as “nice enough.” Unfortunately, "nice enough" isn’t quite good enough to compare favorably with Audi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz or Volvo. We'd say it's not good enough to compare with cross-town rival Lincoln, either, but they won't be selling sedans in 2021. The overall design of the CT5's interior is reasonably good, if evocative of previous-generation BMWs, but it's let down by some noticeable cheap-feeling bits and pieces that feel like they came from one of GM's non-premium divisions ... because they literally came from one of GM's non-premium divisions. By contrast, you won't find Camry switchgear in a Lexus.  Cadillac has a brand-new infotainment system that will be launching in the new Escalade SUV, but the CT5 sticks with the brand’s oft-maligned touchscreen interface (previously known as CUE). As much as customers and journalists have complained about it over the years, the latest (and likely last) version found in the CT5 works pretty well. All the necessary functions are easy to find, and the touchscreen is quick and responsive. And if you really don’t like the …
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Retail Price

$36,995 - $47,795 MSRP / Window Sticker Price
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Engine 2.0L I-4
MPG 23 City / 32 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 10-spd auto w/OD
Power 237 @ 5000 rpm
Drivetrain rear-wheel
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