Carrera 4 2dr All-wheel Drive Coupe
2020 Porsche 911

2020 911 Photos
 Editors' Pick
Autoblog Rating
8.5

The Porsche 911 continues its reign as the sports car standard of the world. Its newest iteration mixes in modern tech to complement the superb driving characteristics that each version of the 911 offers.

Industry
9
On a Tuesday morning back in June, a 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S effectively fell into my lap. “Hey man. Last-second 911 Carrera S with a manual just got scheduled for tomorrow. I'm sending your way.” Sure, it would be the fifth car to rotate through my driveway in a period of about 10 days. That turned out to be, shall we say, creatively challenging. But as Lin-Manuel Miranda sings in “Hamilton,” I don’t know how to say “no” to this. Sure enough, when I least had the bandwidth, there it was: Lin-Manual. No, I didn’t actually name the car. There’s not an enthusiast left alive who doesn’t understand the iterative nature of 911 design, so I’ll spare you the history lesson and focus on the specifics. The 992 S is powered by a 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged flat-six that produces 443 horsepower and 390 pound-feet of torque. That engine is mated to either an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic called PDK or a seven-speed manual transmission (like the one in our loaner) that Porsche says is capable of knocking off a 0-60 run in 4 seconds flat. This is not our first crack at the new 992-generation 911 S, but it is the first time we've sampled one with the seven-speed. Like all “S” models with the manual transmission, Autoblog’s loaner was also equipped with the basic Sport package that includes the adaptive suspension and exhaust systems, and the Sport Chrono package, which sticks an analog clock and lap timer on top of the dashboard along with the rotary drive mode selector on the steering wheel. The only other performance-oriented option included with our test vehicle was the rear-axle steering system. Apart from that, it had a set of Guards Red seat belts, ventilated front sport seats (the four-way Plus variety, if you’re building along at home) and … that’s all. This lack of box-checking produces an especially spartan interior, which suits me just fine. It feels mission-specific, reminding me that the 911 is a buttoned-down sports coupe that prioritizes performance, even if it does so without significantly compromising its day-to-day livability. But let’s talk about that for a second, because I believe there’s a disconnect between perception and reality when it comes to Porsche’s standard bearer. The 911 S is not a coddler. It rides firmly even in its softest setting, and it’s not particularly quiet, either. It’s not rough or unrefined, per se, but rather it provides a great deal of feedback. Feedback is good; it’s there to help the driver make the most of a performance car’s capabilities, but thanks to the big, sticky tires and boisterous exhaust, some of it is going to come in the form of noise. If you’re expecting to be wafted down the highway in serene silence, a 911 Carrera S is not for you. But if you’re the sort who believes that driving a sporty car is as much a conversation as it is a simple mechanical and physiological process, then, like me, you …
Full Review
On a Tuesday morning back in June, a 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S effectively fell into my lap. “Hey man. Last-second 911 Carrera S with a manual just got scheduled for tomorrow. I'm sending your way.” Sure, it would be the fifth car to rotate through my driveway in a period of about 10 days. That turned out to be, shall we say, creatively challenging. But as Lin-Manuel Miranda sings in “Hamilton,” I don’t know how to say “no” to this. Sure enough, when I least had the bandwidth, there it was: Lin-Manual. No, I didn’t actually name the car. There’s not an enthusiast left alive who doesn’t understand the iterative nature of 911 design, so I’ll spare you the history lesson and focus on the specifics. The 992 S is powered by a 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged flat-six that produces 443 horsepower and 390 pound-feet of torque. That engine is mated to either an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic called PDK or a seven-speed manual transmission (like the one in our loaner) that Porsche says is capable of knocking off a 0-60 run in 4 seconds flat. This is not our first crack at the new 992-generation 911 S, but it is the first time we've sampled one with the seven-speed. Like all “S” models with the manual transmission, Autoblog’s loaner was also equipped with the basic Sport package that includes the adaptive suspension and exhaust systems, and the Sport Chrono package, which sticks an analog clock and lap timer on top of the dashboard along with the rotary drive mode selector on the steering wheel. The only other performance-oriented option included with our test vehicle was the rear-axle steering system. Apart from that, it had a set of Guards Red seat belts, ventilated front sport seats (the four-way Plus variety, if you’re building along at home) and … that’s all. This lack of box-checking produces an especially spartan interior, which suits me just fine. It feels mission-specific, reminding me that the 911 is a buttoned-down sports coupe that prioritizes performance, even if it does so without significantly compromising its day-to-day livability. But let’s talk about that for a second, because I believe there’s a disconnect between perception and reality when it comes to Porsche’s standard bearer. The 911 S is not a coddler. It rides firmly even in its softest setting, and it’s not particularly quiet, either. It’s not rough or unrefined, per se, but rather it provides a great deal of feedback. Feedback is good; it’s there to help the driver make the most of a performance car’s capabilities, but thanks to the big, sticky tires and boisterous exhaust, some of it is going to come in the form of noise. If you’re expecting to be wafted down the highway in serene silence, a 911 Carrera S is not for you. But if you’re the sort who believes that driving a sporty car is as much a conversation as it is a simple mechanical and physiological process, then, like me, you …
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Retail Price

$104,700 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

NA Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
Engine 3.0L H-6
MPG 18 City / 24 Hwy
Seating 4 Passengers
Transmission 8-spd auto-shift man w/OD
Power 379 @ 6500 rpm
Drivetrain all wheel
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