Cooper 4dr
2020 MINI Hardtop

2020 Hardtop Photos
The 2020 Mini Cooper SE is Mini's first electric car that it's actually selling widely to the public, rather than a quasi-experimental product a select few could lease. While in most respects, it looks like a plain Mini Hardtop or Cooper S, it instead has a BMW i3 electric motor under the hood. The SE makes 181 horsepower and 199 pound-feet of torque. Between the front seats and under the rear seats are battery packs that give the Mini an estimated 110 miles of range. The new powertrain means the electric Mini sits ever so slightly higher, but it has a lower center of gravity than other Minis, and it has a perfectly even weight distribution front to rear. To get an idea as to what it's like to live with this spunky little commuter, Managing Editor Greg Rasa in Seattle and News Editor Joel Stocksdale in Detroit each spent a week with one. Both cars were the top shelf Iconic trim, bringing the starting price to $37,750 after the $850 destination charge. The SE is also eligible for the $7,500 federal tax credit, making that high price sting a bit less. Check out their thoughts in the discussion below. Joel Stocksdale: Want to talk Mini? Greg Rasa: Sure. So, how to begin ... Fun car. Way fun. JS: So much fun! I took it out for pleasure cruises at least every other day just because it was such a blast. GR: I took mine on some long outings and was pleased with it in every respect. Some background: I drove a 2013 Leaf as a commuter for a couple of years, so that's kind of my baseline for an EV — utilitarian, basic, purpose-built for commuting. And of course I have driven other EVs quite a bit, Niro, etc. The difference with the Mini is apparent from the first impression. Stepping into it, there's a wow factor. Nice interior, quilted seats, yellow racing stripe in the carbon fiber-look dash, goofy space-age sounds. Everything screams fun. JS: What really got me fired up about the driving was the handling. Minis are already great in corners, but this one feels particularly good, and I think a lot of it has to do with the weight balance. It's an even 50/50 front/rear distribution, and you can feel that in turns. It's very neutral and has loads of grip despite the low-rolling-resistance tires. I desperately want to take one to an autocross event. GR: Yes, very grippy. All EVs tend to handle well, I think, given how planted they are with the battery weight down low, but the Mini is the best yet. You're in a John Cooper Works (JCW) now, right? So you're kind of benchmarking against that? JS: A little bit. It's a Countryman JCW, so it's bigger, and the seating position is higher. I'm actually not enjoying it as much, and part of that is that I miss the responsiveness of the electric motor. It's so nice having immediate and …
Full Review
The 2020 Mini Cooper SE is Mini's first electric car that it's actually selling widely to the public, rather than a quasi-experimental product a select few could lease. While in most respects, it looks like a plain Mini Hardtop or Cooper S, it instead has a BMW i3 electric motor under the hood. The SE makes 181 horsepower and 199 pound-feet of torque. Between the front seats and under the rear seats are battery packs that give the Mini an estimated 110 miles of range. The new powertrain means the electric Mini sits ever so slightly higher, but it has a lower center of gravity than other Minis, and it has a perfectly even weight distribution front to rear. To get an idea as to what it's like to live with this spunky little commuter, Managing Editor Greg Rasa in Seattle and News Editor Joel Stocksdale in Detroit each spent a week with one. Both cars were the top shelf Iconic trim, bringing the starting price to $37,750 after the $850 destination charge. The SE is also eligible for the $7,500 federal tax credit, making that high price sting a bit less. Check out their thoughts in the discussion below. Joel Stocksdale: Want to talk Mini? Greg Rasa: Sure. So, how to begin ... Fun car. Way fun. JS: So much fun! I took it out for pleasure cruises at least every other day just because it was such a blast. GR: I took mine on some long outings and was pleased with it in every respect. Some background: I drove a 2013 Leaf as a commuter for a couple of years, so that's kind of my baseline for an EV — utilitarian, basic, purpose-built for commuting. And of course I have driven other EVs quite a bit, Niro, etc. The difference with the Mini is apparent from the first impression. Stepping into it, there's a wow factor. Nice interior, quilted seats, yellow racing stripe in the carbon fiber-look dash, goofy space-age sounds. Everything screams fun. JS: What really got me fired up about the driving was the handling. Minis are already great in corners, but this one feels particularly good, and I think a lot of it has to do with the weight balance. It's an even 50/50 front/rear distribution, and you can feel that in turns. It's very neutral and has loads of grip despite the low-rolling-resistance tires. I desperately want to take one to an autocross event. GR: Yes, very grippy. All EVs tend to handle well, I think, given how planted they are with the battery weight down low, but the Mini is the best yet. You're in a John Cooper Works (JCW) now, right? So you're kind of benchmarking against that? JS: A little bit. It's a Countryman JCW, so it's bigger, and the seating position is higher. I'm actually not enjoying it as much, and part of that is that I miss the responsiveness of the electric motor. It's so nice having immediate and …
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Retail Price

$24,400 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

NA Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
Engine 1.5L I-3
MPG 28 City / 36 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 7-spd auto-shift man
Power 134 @ 4500 rpm
Drivetrain front-wheel
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