110 X 4dr 4x4
2020 Land Rover Defender

2020 Defender Photos
MT EQUINOX, Vt. – Perhaps Americans have had their fill of wimpy, interchangeably styled crossover SUVs. Or, testosterone has found its way into our water supply. Either way, manly 4x4s with authentic designs and rich backstories are enjoying their moment, from the white-hot Ford Bronco and Jeep Wrangler to the Mercedes G-Class and an upcoming, rehabilitated electric Hummer. Britain’s storybook entry is the Land Rover Defender, whose globetrotting, post-WWII history ranged from African treks to movies such as the lion-loving 1966 doc “Born Free.” Yet, it only made an obscure cameo for the United States between 1992 and 1997.  After years of false starts and dashed hopes, and further Covid-driven production delays, the first all-new Defender since 19-freaking-46 is here, including for us long-denied Yankees. And the 2020 Land Rover Defender is nothing short of brilliant, as we discovered over three days in upstate New York and the mountains of Vermont. That included a climb up the green shoulders of Vermont’s Mount Equinox, the tallest summit in the Taconic Mountains. It’s a trip that takes tourists 20 minutes on the 5.2-mile Skyline Drive, the route for America’s oldest auto hillclimb event. We, on the other hand, would be taking the long way up on Mount Equinox's dauntingly steep, bouldered trails. It would take three hours, but the new Land Rover ate it all up and had us begging for more. The Defender’s unstoppable off-road skills come as no surprise, between its stiff “D7x” all-aluminum monocoque, class-topping approach and departure angles, optional adjustable air suspension, new screen-based Terrain Response system, two-speed transfer case, locking center differential and optional active rear-locking diff. Those are joined to systems that — should you choose — take all the guesswork out of four-wheeling, including a water-depth wading sensor, camera views of the ground below the hood, and the ability to set a crawling speed and negotiate terrain semi-autonomously while the systems sort everything out. The surprise was that the Defender, at least in 395-horsepower guise, feels as capable on-road as off. The forceful acceleration, throaty inline-six sound and high-design cabin make even a loaded Wrangler feel like the relatively crude truck it is. While the Defender may look deceptively mall-friendly compared with the Jeep, its 11.5-inch ground clearance and 35.4-inch wading ability both top even the Wrangler Rubicon’s. And where the Jeep accepts curves grudgingly, the Defender can attack them. The Landie handles better than a Mercedes G 550, is nearly as quick from 0-60 mph (the four-door Defender 110's sprint of 5.8 seconds falls a mere two tenths short) and this six-cylinder version’s $63,650 base price (maxing out at $81,250 for the swanky Defender X) undercuts the base $132,000 Mercedes G 550 by nearly $68,000. If one can live with a 2.0-liter, 296-hp turbo four, and its modest 7.7-second trip to 60 mph, the Defender 110’s $51,250 starting price is on par with a fully stuffed Wrangler Rubicon.  That base price gets even lower for 2021 at $47,450 thanks to the two-door, shorter-wheelbase Defender 90 …
Full Review
MT EQUINOX, Vt. – Perhaps Americans have had their fill of wimpy, interchangeably styled crossover SUVs. Or, testosterone has found its way into our water supply. Either way, manly 4x4s with authentic designs and rich backstories are enjoying their moment, from the white-hot Ford Bronco and Jeep Wrangler to the Mercedes G-Class and an upcoming, rehabilitated electric Hummer. Britain’s storybook entry is the Land Rover Defender, whose globetrotting, post-WWII history ranged from African treks to movies such as the lion-loving 1966 doc “Born Free.” Yet, it only made an obscure cameo for the United States between 1992 and 1997.  After years of false starts and dashed hopes, and further Covid-driven production delays, the first all-new Defender since 19-freaking-46 is here, including for us long-denied Yankees. And the 2020 Land Rover Defender is nothing short of brilliant, as we discovered over three days in upstate New York and the mountains of Vermont. That included a climb up the green shoulders of Vermont’s Mount Equinox, the tallest summit in the Taconic Mountains. It’s a trip that takes tourists 20 minutes on the 5.2-mile Skyline Drive, the route for America’s oldest auto hillclimb event. We, on the other hand, would be taking the long way up on Mount Equinox's dauntingly steep, bouldered trails. It would take three hours, but the new Land Rover ate it all up and had us begging for more. The Defender’s unstoppable off-road skills come as no surprise, between its stiff “D7x” all-aluminum monocoque, class-topping approach and departure angles, optional adjustable air suspension, new screen-based Terrain Response system, two-speed transfer case, locking center differential and optional active rear-locking diff. Those are joined to systems that — should you choose — take all the guesswork out of four-wheeling, including a water-depth wading sensor, camera views of the ground below the hood, and the ability to set a crawling speed and negotiate terrain semi-autonomously while the systems sort everything out. The surprise was that the Defender, at least in 395-horsepower guise, feels as capable on-road as off. The forceful acceleration, throaty inline-six sound and high-design cabin make even a loaded Wrangler feel like the relatively crude truck it is. While the Defender may look deceptively mall-friendly compared with the Jeep, its 11.5-inch ground clearance and 35.4-inch wading ability both top even the Wrangler Rubicon’s. And where the Jeep accepts curves grudgingly, the Defender can attack them. The Landie handles better than a Mercedes G 550, is nearly as quick from 0-60 mph (the four-door Defender 110's sprint of 5.8 seconds falls a mere two tenths short) and this six-cylinder version’s $63,650 base price (maxing out at $81,250 for the swanky Defender X) undercuts the base $132,000 Mercedes G 550 by nearly $68,000. If one can live with a 2.0-liter, 296-hp turbo four, and its modest 7.7-second trip to 60 mph, the Defender 110’s $51,250 starting price is on par with a fully stuffed Wrangler Rubicon.  That base price gets even lower for 2021 at $47,450 thanks to the two-door, shorter-wheelbase Defender 90 …
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Retail Price

$80,900 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

NA Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
Engine I-6
MPG 17 City / 22 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 8-spd auto w/OD
Power 395 @ 5500 rpm
Drivetrain Terrain Response 2 four-wheel
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