Base 2dr All-wheel Drive Roadster
2020 Lamborghini Aventador S

2020 Aventador S Photos
A sign at the Miura Ranch in Andalusia, Spain, warns any careless human, “Ganado Bravo – Prohibito Entrar.” Brave Cattle – Do Not Enter. The cattle at issue are specifically bulls, and Ferruccio Lamborghini’s visit to the ranch in the 1960s – Lamborghini himself was a Taurus – would provide the thematic source for the names of his cars. Legend says Murciélago, a Navarra fighting bull, was sired into Don Antonio Miura’s breeding line in 1879 after surviving 24 stabs from the matador’s espada – the audience had clamored for the matador to spare the bull’s life. The bull christened Aventador got no such reprieve, killed by Matador Emilio Muñoz during a bullfight in 1993 in Zaragoza. Aventador did, though, fight fiercely enough to earn the accolade Trofeo de la Peña La Madroñera, awarded to the bravest bull by Zaragosa’s only female bullfighting club, La Madronera. Then someone cut off one of Aventador’s ears and gave it to Muñoz as a trophy. The Lamborghini Aventador, over a run of nine years and going, has fought just as bravely as its namesake and deserves the same trophy. It also – as much as it pains me to write this – deserves to be put to rest. The looks of the 2020 Lamborghini Aventador S Roadster don’t disappoint. Despite the name changes since Marcelo Gandini’s 1974 Countach, Lamborghini’s flagship has largely been an acolyte of the Porsche 911 school of evolutionary design. Nevertheless, every one of the Aventador’s angled, unsparing lines acts like an arrestor cable on passers-by. Long, low, wide in front, and swelling to a carrier-esque beam in the rear, the Aventador is the kind of ruthless transport we’d expect from Cyberdyne Systems or the Weyland-Yutani Corporation – no trace of weakness in it, nor any compassion. Breathtaking instead of beautiful. The only respite from the malice of the test car was in its color, Blu Cephus Pearl. A vivacious neighbor, as soon as she saw the car, christened it Déja Blue. That took some edge off the menace. Almost everything in the cabin is tailored excellence. The look and feel of the stitched leather, the seats, the craftsmanship, all could have come from an Italian atelier – and essentially, for any who’ve seen the leather shop at Sant’Agata Bolognese, they did. The compact cabin provides room for 6-footers; the seats provide continent-crossing comfort. The Aventador S updates the digital gauge cluster from the preceding Aventador LP700-4, omitting the metallic partitions to create one uninterrupted screen. Watching the lights flicker is the same sci-fi dream it was in 2011. The center console, however, is a letdown. When Lamborghini debuted the Aventador, the instrument panel bore switchgear that parent company Audi introduced on the 2004 A8 (aka Audi MMI). Some of the functionality didn’t make sense in 2004, such as turning the infotainment knob to the right to move the cursor up, not down, and needing to press a button then turn a knob to change the fan speed. Since then, …
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A sign at the Miura Ranch in Andalusia, Spain, warns any careless human, “Ganado Bravo – Prohibito Entrar.” Brave Cattle – Do Not Enter. The cattle at issue are specifically bulls, and Ferruccio Lamborghini’s visit to the ranch in the 1960s – Lamborghini himself was a Taurus – would provide the thematic source for the names of his cars. Legend says Murciélago, a Navarra fighting bull, was sired into Don Antonio Miura’s breeding line in 1879 after surviving 24 stabs from the matador’s espada – the audience had clamored for the matador to spare the bull’s life. The bull christened Aventador got no such reprieve, killed by Matador Emilio Muñoz during a bullfight in 1993 in Zaragoza. Aventador did, though, fight fiercely enough to earn the accolade Trofeo de la Peña La Madroñera, awarded to the bravest bull by Zaragosa’s only female bullfighting club, La Madronera. Then someone cut off one of Aventador’s ears and gave it to Muñoz as a trophy. The Lamborghini Aventador, over a run of nine years and going, has fought just as bravely as its namesake and deserves the same trophy. It also – as much as it pains me to write this – deserves to be put to rest. The looks of the 2020 Lamborghini Aventador S Roadster don’t disappoint. Despite the name changes since Marcelo Gandini’s 1974 Countach, Lamborghini’s flagship has largely been an acolyte of the Porsche 911 school of evolutionary design. Nevertheless, every one of the Aventador’s angled, unsparing lines acts like an arrestor cable on passers-by. Long, low, wide in front, and swelling to a carrier-esque beam in the rear, the Aventador is the kind of ruthless transport we’d expect from Cyberdyne Systems or the Weyland-Yutani Corporation – no trace of weakness in it, nor any compassion. Breathtaking instead of beautiful. The only respite from the malice of the test car was in its color, Blu Cephus Pearl. A vivacious neighbor, as soon as she saw the car, christened it Déja Blue. That took some edge off the menace. Almost everything in the cabin is tailored excellence. The look and feel of the stitched leather, the seats, the craftsmanship, all could have come from an Italian atelier – and essentially, for any who’ve seen the leather shop at Sant’Agata Bolognese, they did. The compact cabin provides room for 6-footers; the seats provide continent-crossing comfort. The Aventador S updates the digital gauge cluster from the preceding Aventador LP700-4, omitting the metallic partitions to create one uninterrupted screen. Watching the lights flicker is the same sci-fi dream it was in 2011. The center console, however, is a letdown. When Lamborghini debuted the Aventador, the instrument panel bore switchgear that parent company Audi introduced on the 2004 A8 (aka Audi MMI). Some of the functionality didn’t make sense in 2004, such as turning the infotainment knob to the right to move the cursor up, not down, and needing to press a button then turn a knob to change the fan speed. Since then, …
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Retail Price

$460,422 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

NA Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
Engine 6.5L V-12
MPG 9 City / 15 Hwy
Seating 2 Passengers
Transmission 7-spd auto-shift man w/OD
Power 729 @ 8400 rpm
Drivetrain all wheel
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