2020 Hyundai Venue

2020 Venue Photos
The 2020 Venue is Hyundai's foray into a new type of subcompact: an entry-level crossover. Hyundai launched the new Venue late in 2019, dipping even farther down the size spectrum to deliver something smaller than even the subcompact Kona.  The Venue is exclusively front-wheel drive, though you can option the entry-level model with a manual transmission. Power comes from a 1.6L 4-pot putting out 121 ponies and 113 pound-feet of torque. This doesn't make the Venue especially quick, but it's enough to get the job done under most circumstances. Our test model was an SEL with both the Premium and Convenience packages, pushing the total price up to $23,270. That price point opens up several other options, both tiny and not, so we were eager to see how the Venue performed in the real world.  Road Test Editor Zac Palmer: This car is small. Remarkably small. The Hyundai Kona is a tiny car, but this Venue is five inches shorter, and it shows right away. I parked it next to a new Honda Civic, and the Civic dwarfed this crossover. That may say more about how large the Civic has gotten these days, but the point remains. The Venue is economical personal transportation with a personality, emphasis on personal. I tried sitting in the backseat with the driver seat set where I was comfortable, and it wasn’t pleasant — I’m 5’10”. Uber and Lyft are going to have to start barring cars from use based on rear seat room. The Prius Cs are bad enough to ride around in these days. I was plenty pleased to walk up to the cute crossover and hop in the driver’s seat, though. Many subcompact crossovers aim to be spunky, but none of them are as easy on the eyes as the Venue is. I adore the intricate and intriguing taillights. Even in white paint and SEL trimmings, the Venue is bursting with the kind of youthful presence that so many other car companies try to capture. Subcompact crossovers are rarely appealing to my eye, with overwrought plastic molding and dysfunctional shapes, but the Venue does it right. Some of the Venue’s design is spectacularly functional, too. Its upright and squarish shape allows for a large greenhouse and great visibility through the front windshield. Even the A-pillars are thin. I have some grumblings about the way it drives, but at its low price point, there isn’t a deal breaker in sight. Senior Editor, Green, John Beltz Snyder: I really wanted to love the Venue. I was taken by its exterior when I saw it in the flesh on the floor of the New York Auto Show. I must not have looked inside that one. When I got into the one we had in our office, I was underwhelmed. Lots of cheap-looking plastic in great, unbroken swaths with a touchscreen unartfully tacked onto the center of it all. The most interesting visual feature was the cargo tray in front of the passenger seat. Actually driving …
Full Review
The 2020 Venue is Hyundai's foray into a new type of subcompact: an entry-level crossover. Hyundai launched the new Venue late in 2019, dipping even farther down the size spectrum to deliver something smaller than even the subcompact Kona.  The Venue is exclusively front-wheel drive, though you can option the entry-level model with a manual transmission. Power comes from a 1.6L 4-pot putting out 121 ponies and 113 pound-feet of torque. This doesn't make the Venue especially quick, but it's enough to get the job done under most circumstances. Our test model was an SEL with both the Premium and Convenience packages, pushing the total price up to $23,270. That price point opens up several other options, both tiny and not, so we were eager to see how the Venue performed in the real world.  Road Test Editor Zac Palmer: This car is small. Remarkably small. The Hyundai Kona is a tiny car, but this Venue is five inches shorter, and it shows right away. I parked it next to a new Honda Civic, and the Civic dwarfed this crossover. That may say more about how large the Civic has gotten these days, but the point remains. The Venue is economical personal transportation with a personality, emphasis on personal. I tried sitting in the backseat with the driver seat set where I was comfortable, and it wasn’t pleasant — I’m 5’10”. Uber and Lyft are going to have to start barring cars from use based on rear seat room. The Prius Cs are bad enough to ride around in these days. I was plenty pleased to walk up to the cute crossover and hop in the driver’s seat, though. Many subcompact crossovers aim to be spunky, but none of them are as easy on the eyes as the Venue is. I adore the intricate and intriguing taillights. Even in white paint and SEL trimmings, the Venue is bursting with the kind of youthful presence that so many other car companies try to capture. Subcompact crossovers are rarely appealing to my eye, with overwrought plastic molding and dysfunctional shapes, but the Venue does it right. Some of the Venue’s design is spectacularly functional, too. Its upright and squarish shape allows for a large greenhouse and great visibility through the front windshield. Even the A-pillars are thin. I have some grumblings about the way it drives, but at its low price point, there isn’t a deal breaker in sight. Senior Editor, Green, John Beltz Snyder: I really wanted to love the Venue. I was taken by its exterior when I saw it in the flesh on the floor of the New York Auto Show. I must not have looked inside that one. When I got into the one we had in our office, I was underwhelmed. Lots of cheap-looking plastic in great, unbroken swaths with a touchscreen unartfully tacked onto the center of it all. The most interesting visual feature was the cargo tray in front of the passenger seat. Actually driving …
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Retail Price

$17,350 - $22,050 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

$426 - $543 Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
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Engine 1.6L I-4
MPG 27 City / 35 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 6-spd man w/OD
Power 121 @ 6300 rpm
Drivetrain front-wheel
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