Carrera 4 GTS 2dr All-wheel Drive Coupe
2019 Porsche 911

2019 911 Photos
 Editors' Pick
Autoblog Rating
9

The only naturally-aspirated 911 left might just be the best one. Interior is starting to feel dated, but you'll forget all about it once you get moving.

Industry
9
SARDINIA, Italy — As 21st-century Porsche 911s go, few hit peak analog quite so completely as the GT3 Touring. Free-breathing, naturally aspirated 4.0-liter flat-six? Check. Six-speed manual? Mandatory. In a world that's gone nearly completely paddle-shifted, turbocharged, and computerized, the wingless $146,350 coupe was a laser-focused answer to the nagging question enthusiasts couldn't stop asking. And on its heels, Porsche has — for the first time — dropped the top on a GT-based car: the 2019 911 Speedster. But rather than employing the familiar Cabriolet nomenclature, the boys from Zuffenhausen have classified the new ragtop as a Speedster a la previous versions like the 356 (1954), G-Series (1989), 964 (1992), and 997 (2010). This time around, only 1,948 will be made — a sliver of people by big-car-company standards, but a rather optimistic figure considering its breathtaking asking price of $275,750. There is, admittedly, a whole lot of goodness to the new Speedster's underpinnings. The 502-horsepower, 346-pound-feet powerplant paired with the lightweight, steel syncro-equipped six-speed is perhaps the last of its breed, as its naturally-aspirated flat-six with individual throttle bodies inherited from the 911 GT3 R race car. %Slideshow-1042492% The GT3 models' high-spec suspension and drivetrain bits are also here, though the damping rates are slightly more forgiving and ride height increases by 5 millimeters. The carbon ceramic stoppers also have slightly softer compounds for easier modulation — all of which can be attributed to the Speedster's status as more of a pleasure-focused road car than a truly all-out racetrack special. But don't let the milder-mannered bits fool you: Along Sardinia's winding country backroads, which are convincing impersonations of S-curves on technical race circuits, the Speedster feels like it's directly plugged into the driver's brain. The controls are relatively simple: a button-free steering wheel, a shortened shift lever, and a three-pedal setup that incorporates an auto-blip downshift option available through a button on the center console. Most spirited driving can be accomplished in the default mode, though pressing "ESC OFF" enables you to push the car harder through corners with more access to the power curve, with the stability control disabled for more slip-n-slide action while leaving traction control on. Keep your foot planted on the right pedal, and there's a deep well of acceleration to draw from, one that keeps delivering thanks to the peak power at 8,400 rpm and a redline that arrives at 9,000 rpm. You'll likely want to spend the bulk of your time between 6,000 rpm and 9,000 rpm, though it's not quite as noisy as you might expect. That's largely due to the addition of a gas particulate filter that's required by new European regulations and manages to stifle some of the sweet screams of the GT3 engine. The sonic sacrifices extend to U.S.-market cars too, apparently, because stateside exhaust systems will have elements in place of the particulate filter to create equivalent amounts of back pressure. And while the deliciously crescendoing engine draws less attention to itself because it doesn't scream like the …
Full Review
SARDINIA, Italy — As 21st-century Porsche 911s go, few hit peak analog quite so completely as the GT3 Touring. Free-breathing, naturally aspirated 4.0-liter flat-six? Check. Six-speed manual? Mandatory. In a world that's gone nearly completely paddle-shifted, turbocharged, and computerized, the wingless $146,350 coupe was a laser-focused answer to the nagging question enthusiasts couldn't stop asking. And on its heels, Porsche has — for the first time — dropped the top on a GT-based car: the 2019 911 Speedster. But rather than employing the familiar Cabriolet nomenclature, the boys from Zuffenhausen have classified the new ragtop as a Speedster a la previous versions like the 356 (1954), G-Series (1989), 964 (1992), and 997 (2010). This time around, only 1,948 will be made — a sliver of people by big-car-company standards, but a rather optimistic figure considering its breathtaking asking price of $275,750. There is, admittedly, a whole lot of goodness to the new Speedster's underpinnings. The 502-horsepower, 346-pound-feet powerplant paired with the lightweight, steel syncro-equipped six-speed is perhaps the last of its breed, as its naturally-aspirated flat-six with individual throttle bodies inherited from the 911 GT3 R race car. %Slideshow-1042492% The GT3 models' high-spec suspension and drivetrain bits are also here, though the damping rates are slightly more forgiving and ride height increases by 5 millimeters. The carbon ceramic stoppers also have slightly softer compounds for easier modulation — all of which can be attributed to the Speedster's status as more of a pleasure-focused road car than a truly all-out racetrack special. But don't let the milder-mannered bits fool you: Along Sardinia's winding country backroads, which are convincing impersonations of S-curves on technical race circuits, the Speedster feels like it's directly plugged into the driver's brain. The controls are relatively simple: a button-free steering wheel, a shortened shift lever, and a three-pedal setup that incorporates an auto-blip downshift option available through a button on the center console. Most spirited driving can be accomplished in the default mode, though pressing "ESC OFF" enables you to push the car harder through corners with more access to the power curve, with the stability control disabled for more slip-n-slide action while leaving traction control on. Keep your foot planted on the right pedal, and there's a deep well of acceleration to draw from, one that keeps delivering thanks to the peak power at 8,400 rpm and a redline that arrives at 9,000 rpm. You'll likely want to spend the bulk of your time between 6,000 rpm and 9,000 rpm, though it's not quite as noisy as you might expect. That's largely due to the addition of a gas particulate filter that's required by new European regulations and manages to stifle some of the sweet screams of the GT3 engine. The sonic sacrifices extend to U.S.-market cars too, apparently, because stateside exhaust systems will have elements in place of the particulate filter to create equivalent amounts of back pressure. And while the deliciously crescendoing engine draws less attention to itself because it doesn't scream like the …
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Retail Price

$127,600 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

NA Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
Engine 3.0LH-6
MPG 18 City / 26 Hwy
Seating 4 Passengers
Transmission 7-spd man w/OD
Power 450 @ 6500 rpm
Drivetrain all wheel
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