Cooper S 4dr Front-wheel Drive Sport Utility
2019 MINI Countryman

2019 Countryman Photos
The 2019 Mini Countryman is a retro-themed crossover that draws on the Mini Cooper for its heritage cues. It's the biggest Mini yet, and it's more practical than the hatchback Cooper-and nearly as cute.

Nothing of consequence has changed for the 2019 model year. Launched as a 2011 model, the Countryman was redesigned for 2017.

Like the hatchback Mini Cooper, the Countryman comes with a choice of three engines: base 3-cylinder, 4-cylinder in Cooper S, and higher-output turbo-4 beneath the stubby bonnet of the John Cooper Works editions. The Countryman also comes with Mini's first hybrid powertrain.

Three trim levels are available: Classic, Signature, and top-level Iconic. Classic trim omits some safety features and options. Every body color other than gray costs extra. Signature trim makes more options available, and is a better choice overall.

Rated at 134 horsepower, the turbo-3 base engine mates with either a 6-speed manual or 8-speed automatic transmission. Stepping up a sizable notch in performance, the Countryman S holds a 2.0-liter turbo-4 that generates 189 horsepower.

A higher-output turbo-4, cranking out 228 horsepower, powers John Cooper Works models. BMW (Mini's parent company) uses the same 228-hp engine for its X1 and X2 crossovers. Turbo-4 models can have the standard 6-speed manual gearbox, but the 8-speed automatic is a no-cost option.

Front-wheel drive is standard, but most Countryman buyers are likely to pay $2,000 additional for all-wheel drive. It's standard on the hybrid and on John Cooper Works editions. A 6-speed manual gearbox is standard, but 8-speed automatic is available without additional cost.

Mini's first plug-in hybrid, the S E Countryman ALL4, can travel as much as 12 miles on electricity alone. A turbocharged 3-cylinder gasoline engine mates with an electric motor and a 7.6-kwh battery, for total system output of 221 horsepower.

Crash-testing by the IIHS resulted in top 'Good'? scores on all tests, including the driver-side small overlap crash. The NHTSA has not tested the Countryman. Automatic emergency braking is standard, except for base models..
Full Review

The 2019 Mini Countryman is a retro-themed crossover that draws on the Mini Cooper for its heritage cues. It's the biggest Mini yet, and it's more practical than the hatchback Cooper-and nearly as cute.

Nothing of consequence has changed for the 2019 model year. Launched as a 2011 model, the Countryman was redesigned for 2017.

Like the hatchback Mini Cooper, the Countryman comes with a choice of three engines: base 3-cylinder, 4-cylinder in Cooper S, and higher-output turbo-4 beneath the stubby bonnet of the John Cooper Works editions. The Countryman also comes with Mini's first hybrid powertrain.

Three trim levels are available: Classic, Signature, and top-level Iconic. Classic trim omits some safety features and options. Every body color other than gray costs extra. Signature trim makes more options available, and is a better choice overall.

Rated at 134 horsepower, the turbo-3 base engine mates with either a 6-speed manual or 8-speed automatic transmission. Stepping up a sizable notch in performance, the Countryman S holds a 2.0-liter turbo-4 that generates 189 horsepower.

A higher-output turbo-4, cranking out 228 horsepower, powers John Cooper Works models. BMW (Mini's parent company) uses the same 228-hp engine for its X1 and X2 crossovers. Turbo-4 models can have the standard 6-speed manual gearbox, but the 8-speed automatic is a no-cost option.

Front-wheel drive is standard, but most Countryman buyers are likely to pay $2,000 additional for all-wheel drive. It's standard on the hybrid and on John Cooper Works editions. A 6-speed manual gearbox is standard, but 8-speed automatic is available without additional cost.

Mini's first plug-in hybrid, the S E Countryman ALL4, can travel as much as 12 miles on electricity alone. A turbocharged 3-cylinder gasoline engine mates with an electric motor and a 7.6-kwh battery, for total system output of 221 horsepower.

Crash-testing by the IIHS resulted in top 'Good'? scores on all tests, including the driver-side small overlap crash. The NHTSA has not tested the Countryman. Automatic emergency braking is standard, except for base models..
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Retail Price

$30,900 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

NA Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
Engine 2.0L I-4
MPG 23 City / 32 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 8-spd w/OD
Power 189 @ 5000 rpm
Drivetrain front-wheel
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