2019 Honda Passport

2019 Passport Photos
The larger, three-row Honda Pilot is a big crossover that's squarely aimed at families, with lots of minivan-inspired convenience features to make life with a car full of kids more livable. The two-row Honda Passport is essentially a shortened Pilot, with one less row of seats and a bit of an attitude adjustment. Honda is pushing the Passport as more of an adventure-ready crossover, although that doesn't mean the Passport is ready for the sort of ultra-rugged terrain a Toyota 4Runner can handle. Instead, the Passport suggests a rugged, outdoorsy lifestyle with some sportier exterior accents, a slightly wider stance, and a little extra ground clearance. And it is the most rugged vehicle in Honda's lineup. Let's take a closer look. What's new for 2019? In one sense, everything. This is the first year for the Honda Passport. The nameplate was last used on a rebadged Isuzu Rodeo SUV, back when Honda desperately needed an entry into the utility segment before its own original Pilot made it to market. But in another sense, this is a very familiar vehicle. It's mechanically very close to the Honda Pilot, using the same engine, transmission, all-wheel drive system, and much of the interior. The styling is clearly related to the Pilot but with a distinctly sportier nature. What's the interior and in-car tech like? If you've seen the inside of a new Honda Pilot, you'll be right at home in the Passport. The first two rows are virtually identical. The Passport gets perforated leather on the steering wheel, and the second-row passengers get an additional 1.2 inches of legroom since there's no third row behind them. So while not much is different, that's not such a bad thing. The Honda Passport and Pilot share the company contemporary interior aesthetic, which is clean and functional. The infotainment system has a volume knob rather than the rage-inducing touch capacitive slider that the company played with for a few years, but it lacks the secondary menu buttons and tuning knob found in the Accord and Odyssey (as well as their newer software). The displays – infotainment and gauge cluster – are crisp and clear. Honda's push-button transmission selector remains an annoyance that takes some focus and attention to operate. Storage solutions abound, from the deep center storage cubby to the useful bin underneath the cargo floor. How big is it? It's a healthy two-row. The Passport is 190.5 inches long overall, and is on the same 111-inch wheelbase as the Pilot. It has 41.2 cubic feet of cargo space behind the second row. The Passport splits the difference between some of its competition, a little longer than the Edge with a tad more cargo room, and a little shorter than the Blazer with a lot more cargo room. Both the Edge and the Blazer have longer wheelbases, however, by about an inch. The Nissan Murano is a little longer on a similar wheelbase, with less cargo room. As far as major interior measurements go, the Passport's …
Full Review
The larger, three-row Honda Pilot is a big crossover that's squarely aimed at families, with lots of minivan-inspired convenience features to make life with a car full of kids more livable. The two-row Honda Passport is essentially a shortened Pilot, with one less row of seats and a bit of an attitude adjustment. Honda is pushing the Passport as more of an adventure-ready crossover, although that doesn't mean the Passport is ready for the sort of ultra-rugged terrain a Toyota 4Runner can handle. Instead, the Passport suggests a rugged, outdoorsy lifestyle with some sportier exterior accents, a slightly wider stance, and a little extra ground clearance. And it is the most rugged vehicle in Honda's lineup. Let's take a closer look. What's new for 2019? In one sense, everything. This is the first year for the Honda Passport. The nameplate was last used on a rebadged Isuzu Rodeo SUV, back when Honda desperately needed an entry into the utility segment before its own original Pilot made it to market. But in another sense, this is a very familiar vehicle. It's mechanically very close to the Honda Pilot, using the same engine, transmission, all-wheel drive system, and much of the interior. The styling is clearly related to the Pilot but with a distinctly sportier nature. What's the interior and in-car tech like? If you've seen the inside of a new Honda Pilot, you'll be right at home in the Passport. The first two rows are virtually identical. The Passport gets perforated leather on the steering wheel, and the second-row passengers get an additional 1.2 inches of legroom since there's no third row behind them. So while not much is different, that's not such a bad thing. The Honda Passport and Pilot share the company contemporary interior aesthetic, which is clean and functional. The infotainment system has a volume knob rather than the rage-inducing touch capacitive slider that the company played with for a few years, but it lacks the secondary menu buttons and tuning knob found in the Accord and Odyssey (as well as their newer software). The displays – infotainment and gauge cluster – are crisp and clear. Honda's push-button transmission selector remains an annoyance that takes some focus and attention to operate. Storage solutions abound, from the deep center storage cubby to the useful bin underneath the cargo floor. How big is it? It's a healthy two-row. The Passport is 190.5 inches long overall, and is on the same 111-inch wheelbase as the Pilot. It has 41.2 cubic feet of cargo space behind the second row. The Passport splits the difference between some of its competition, a little longer than the Edge with a tad more cargo room, and a little shorter than the Blazer with a lot more cargo room. Both the Edge and the Blazer have longer wheelbases, however, by about an inch. The Nissan Murano is a little longer on a similar wheelbase, with less cargo room. As far as major interior measurements go, the Passport's …
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Retail Price

$31,990 - $43,680 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

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$862 Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
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Engine 3.5LV-6
MPG 20 City / 25 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 9-spd auto w/OD
Power 280 @ 6000 rpm
Drivetrain front-wheel
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