2019 Genesis G70

2019 G70 Photos
It's rare when we get the opportunity to evaluate multiple versions of the same make and model in proximity of each other — at least away from a manufacturer-sponsored event. So, when we got the chance to test the 2019 Genesis G70 in back-to-back weeks in different guises, Senior Editor Alex Kierstein and contributing editor James Riswick happily accepted the chance to compare, contrast and make the same sort of observations actual car buyers might make when trying to decide between one variation and another. In basic terms, it pitted a V6 with an eight-speed automatic against a turbocharged inline-four sporting a six-speed manual. However, there's more than just powertrain to consider with the G70, as like other sport sedans, there are a variety of enhancements that change the way it handles, rides and sounds. We started with a 3.3T Dynamic Edition painted a vibrant Havana Red with diamond-quilted black leather and red stitching. As the name implies, it has a turbocharged 3.3-liter V6, good for 365 horsepower and 376 pound-feet of torque, and is only paired with an eight-speed automatic transmission. All-wheel drive is an option, but our car only utilized the wheels out back. A limited-slip differential is standard with the V6, however, along with variable ratio steering. The standard sport-tuned suspension also gets upgraded to electronically controlled adaptive dampers in the Sport trim level. The only difference between that trim and the Dynamic Edition (limited to 400 units) is further upgraded Brembo brakes and Michelin Pilot Sport tires. The 2.0T loses the variable gear ratio on its electric power steering (still rack-mounted), and you can't get the fancy dampers, but is otherwise available with the same feature content as the 3.3T. Well, unless you opt for the six-speed manual transmission fitted to our test car and only available with the 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder that produces 252 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque. Whereas the eight-speed automatic can be paired to all-wheel drive and various trim levels (dubbed "packages" by Genesis in a matter of semantics), the manual is rear-drive only and available with a single package/trim level that basically adds a few choice extras to a standard car, such as 19-inch wheels, Brembo brakes, limited-slip, LED headlights, heated/ventilated seats and the superb Lexicon stereo. It's also leatherette or nothing with the manual. No leather, no fancy diamond quilting. And as for forward collision mitigation or adaptive cruise control, Genesis apparently didn't think it was worth engineering the manual to work with automated braking tech. Contributing Editor James Riswick: I'm a "Save the Manuals" kind of guy. I understand why they're disappearing, but that doesn't mean I have to like it. So when a new car bucks the trend, I take note, especially when it's a performance-oriented car like the G70. And double especially since I longed for a manual transmission during my road trip in the Kia Stinger, a car that shares its rear-drive platform with the G70. So, in a way, this is a case of …
Full Review
It's rare when we get the opportunity to evaluate multiple versions of the same make and model in proximity of each other — at least away from a manufacturer-sponsored event. So, when we got the chance to test the 2019 Genesis G70 in back-to-back weeks in different guises, Senior Editor Alex Kierstein and contributing editor James Riswick happily accepted the chance to compare, contrast and make the same sort of observations actual car buyers might make when trying to decide between one variation and another. In basic terms, it pitted a V6 with an eight-speed automatic against a turbocharged inline-four sporting a six-speed manual. However, there's more than just powertrain to consider with the G70, as like other sport sedans, there are a variety of enhancements that change the way it handles, rides and sounds. We started with a 3.3T Dynamic Edition painted a vibrant Havana Red with diamond-quilted black leather and red stitching. As the name implies, it has a turbocharged 3.3-liter V6, good for 365 horsepower and 376 pound-feet of torque, and is only paired with an eight-speed automatic transmission. All-wheel drive is an option, but our car only utilized the wheels out back. A limited-slip differential is standard with the V6, however, along with variable ratio steering. The standard sport-tuned suspension also gets upgraded to electronically controlled adaptive dampers in the Sport trim level. The only difference between that trim and the Dynamic Edition (limited to 400 units) is further upgraded Brembo brakes and Michelin Pilot Sport tires. The 2.0T loses the variable gear ratio on its electric power steering (still rack-mounted), and you can't get the fancy dampers, but is otherwise available with the same feature content as the 3.3T. Well, unless you opt for the six-speed manual transmission fitted to our test car and only available with the 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder that produces 252 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque. Whereas the eight-speed automatic can be paired to all-wheel drive and various trim levels (dubbed "packages" by Genesis in a matter of semantics), the manual is rear-drive only and available with a single package/trim level that basically adds a few choice extras to a standard car, such as 19-inch wheels, Brembo brakes, limited-slip, LED headlights, heated/ventilated seats and the superb Lexicon stereo. It's also leatherette or nothing with the manual. No leather, no fancy diamond quilting. And as for forward collision mitigation or adaptive cruise control, Genesis apparently didn't think it was worth engineering the manual to work with automated braking tech. Contributing Editor James Riswick: I'm a "Save the Manuals" kind of guy. I understand why they're disappearing, but that doesn't mean I have to like it. So when a new car bucks the trend, I take note, especially when it's a performance-oriented car like the G70. And double especially since I longed for a manual transmission during my road trip in the Kia Stinger, a car that shares its rear-drive platform with the G70. So, in a way, this is a case of …
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Retail Price

$34,900 - $52,250 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

$319 - $482 Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
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Engine 2.0LI-4
MPG 22 City / 30 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 8-spd auto w/OD
Power 252 @ 6200 rpm
Drivetrain rear-wheel
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